2020 Election: Secure Your Vote Election security coverage from NPR.
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2020 Election: Secure Your Vote

A West Bloomfield, Mich., Clerk's Office employee sorts absentee ballots by the precinct and ballot number on Oct. 31. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

Matthew Masterson, then a senior cybersecurity adviser at the Department of Homeland Security, testifies before a House Judiciary Committee hearing in 2019. He left his post on Friday. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Christopher Krebs, recently ousted as director of the Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, is sworn in to testify last year on Capitol Hill. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Fired Official Says Correcting Trump's Fraud Claims The 'Right Thing To Do'

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Zhanon Morales, 30, of Philadelphia raises a fist during a Nov. 5 voting rights rally. President Trump's campaign unsuccessfully used spurious claims of voter fraud to invalidate votes in Philadelphia and other largely Black cities. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP

Trump Push To Invalidate Votes In Heavily Black Cities Alarms Civil Rights Groups

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President Trump's lawyer Rudy Giuliani points to a map Thursday while speaking to the press about lawsuits related to the 2020 election at the Republican National Committee headquarters in Washington, D.C. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Election personnel sort ballots in preparation for an audit at the Gwinnett County Board of Voter Registrations and Elections offices on Saturday in Lawrenceville, Ga. President Trump's attempt at legal action to contest the results of the election have so far been mostly unsuccessful. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Election workers examine ballots Friday in Cobb County in metro Atlanta as part of a statewide recount of the presidential race. Emil Moffatt/WABE hide caption

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Emil Moffatt/WABE

With Biden Ahead, Georgia Begins Hand Recount Of Nearly 5 Million Ballots

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Supporters of President Trump try to enter a room where Michigan absentee ballots are being counted Wednesday at TCF Center in Detroit. Seth Herald/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Seth Herald/AFP via Getty Images

Election workers check the tapes from the voting machines to verify they contain the correct signatures from polling stations after polls closed in the general election at Ford Field on November 3, 2020 in Detroit. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

Demonstrators stand across the street from the federal courthouse in Houston, Monday, Nov. 2, 2020, before a hearing in federal court involving drive-thru ballots cast in Harris County. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Voters drop off ballots last month at a drive-through polling place in Houston. Some 127,000 voters cast their ballots at drive-through locations in the Houston area. Callaghan O'Hare/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Callaghan O'Hare/Bloomberg via Getty Images

John Hansberry with the Philadelphia City Commissioners Office runs a sorting machine at the city's mail-in ballot sorting and counting center on Oct. 26. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

Philadelphia Gears Up For Unprecedented Attention To Its Vote Count

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Black Lives Matter protesters display wristbands reading "I Voted" after leaving a polling place this month in Louisville, Ky. Activists warn Black and Latino voters are being flooded with disinformation intended to suppress turnout in the election's final days. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Black And Latino Voters Flooded With Disinformation In Election's Final Days

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A local resident arrives to cast her ballot during early voting for the general election on Oct. 20 in Adel, Iowa. A new analysis by NPR, the Center for Public Integrity and Stateline reveals that since 2016, 261 polling places in the state have been closed, most due to COVID-19. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Polling Places Are Closing Due To COVID-19. It Could Tip Races In 1 Swing State

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Voters fill out their ballots in Miami this week. Pandemic-driven changes to voting have led to a flood of disinformation about the election process. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Robocalls, Rumors And Emails: Last-Minute Election Disinformation Floods Voters

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A Clark County, Nev., election worker scans mail-in ballots earlier this week in North Las Vegas. The state allows officials to count ballots received in advance of Election Day in order to speed the tabulation of results that evening. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images