2020 Election: Secure Your Vote Election security coverage from NPR.
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2020 Election: Secure Your Vote

The headquarters of the military intelligence agency GRU in Moscow. The FBI and other U.S. agencies want to stop more interference like that launched from here against the U.S. in 2016. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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Pavel Golovkin/AP

With Next Goal To Secure 2020 Elections, Feds Seek To Absorb Lessons From 2016

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The U.S. has spent hundreds of millions of dollars since 2016 to make election practices at every level of government more secure. Mark Ralston /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston /AFP/Getty Images

Facebook confirmed that it met with other tech companies and U.S. national security officials to discuss aligning efforts to safeguard the 2020 presidential election. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP

Voters cast their ballots at a polling station set up at Grady High School for the mid-term elections last November in Atlanta, Georgia. Georgia is set to replace all of its voting machines, which cybersecurity experts had deemed insecure, before the 2020 elections. Jessica McGowan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Cyber Experts Warn Of Vulnerabilities Facing 2020 Election Machines

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Attendees in Bucks County, Pa. test-drove new voting machines at an event aimed at helping the county decide which equipment to buy. Security is a major focus in the 2020 presidential race. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

States Upgrade Election Equipment — Wary Of 'A Race Without A Finish Line'

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"Deepfakes" are digitally altered images that make incidents appear real when they are not. Such altered files could have broad implications for politics. Marcus Marritt for NPR hide caption

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Marcus Marritt for NPR

Much of the fleet of electronic voting machines in the United States was designed without security in mind, in response to the last big national flap over an election in 2000. Marcus Marritt for NPR hide caption

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Marcus Marritt for NPR