2020 Election: Secure Your Vote Election security coverage from NPR.
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2020 Election: Secure Your Vote

A Republican party observer, right, watches as an employee at the Palm Beach County Supervisor Of Elections office goes through a stack of damaged ballots, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018, in West Palm Beach, Fla. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Karina Shumate, 21, a college student, filled out a voter registration form in Richardson, Texas on Jan. 18. One big registration effort this year has drawn controversy among elections officials. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

A Big Vote Registration Push Reaches Millions — But Divides Elections Officials

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Precinct captain Carl Voss of Des Moines displays the Iowa Democratic Party caucus reporting app on his phone outside of the Iowa Democratic Party headquarters. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP

Iowa Caucus Meltdown Proved Transparency Is Essential, Election-Watchers Say

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Sens. Richard Burr, R-N.C., (right) and Mark Warner, D-Va., — pictured in September 2018 — released a report on election security Thursday. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Des Moines City Councilman and a precinct chair Carl Voss shows the app that was used for caucus results reporting on his smartphone after he unsuccessfully attempted to drop off a caucus results packet from Precinct 55 at the Iowa Democratic Party headquarters on Tuesday in Des Moines, Iowa. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Computer mouse pads with "Secure the Vote" logos on them sit on a vendor's table at an election officials conference in 2018. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

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Mel Evans/AP

1 Simple Step Could Help Election Security. Governments Aren't Doing It

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Security experts are urging U.S. political candidates to focus more on cybersecurity to avoid embarrassing or damaging hacks. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

2020 Political Campaigns Are Trying To Avoid A 2016-Style Hack

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Then-Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann electronically cast his ballot in Jackson, Miss., on Nov. 5, 2019. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Election Officials To Convene Amid Historic Focus On Voting And Interference

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Voters cast their ballots in Sutton, New Hampshire on Nov. 8, 2016. State officials say the state's old-school paper ballots mean its election systems are more secure than in other states. Ryan McBride/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ryan McBride/AFP via Getty Images

Protector Of N.H. Primary Claims 'You Can't Hack This Pencil,' But Worries Persist

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How To Spot 2020 Election Disinformation

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Voters in King County, Wash., will have the opportunity to vote on their smartphones in February. It will be the first election in U.S. history in which all eligible voters will be able to vote using their personal devices. Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

Exclusive: Seattle-Area Voters To Vote By Smartphone In 1st For U.S. Elections

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Intelligence Community Threats Executive Shelby Pierson told NPR that more nations may attempt more types of interference in the United States. "This isn't a Russia-only problem," she says. Kisha Ravi/NPR hide caption

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Kisha Ravi/NPR

Election Security Boss: Threats To 2020 Are Now Broader, More Diverse

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