Heat and Health in American Cities Low-income areas of cities are often hotter than their wealthier counterparts, and that heat can have dire health consequences.
Special Series

Heat and Health in American Cities

Sean McMinn/NPR

As Rising Heat Bakes U.S. Cities, The Poor Often Feel It Most

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/754044732/757220164" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A tree grows beneath a power line in the Park DuValle neighborhood of Louisville, Ky. Urban environments can be especially harsh on trees. Sean McMinn/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Sean McMinn/NPR

Trees Are Key To Fighting Urban Heat — But Cities Keep Losing Them

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/755349748/757626267" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jeanetta Churchill stands outside of her Baltimore row house. She says she has to keep her air running constantly in the summer in order to manage her bipolar disorder. Nora Eckert/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Nora Eckert/NPR

How High Heat Can Impact Mental Health

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/757034136/757424159" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript