Short Wave New discoveries, everyday mysteries, and the science behind the headlines — all in about 10 minutes, every weekday. It's science for everyone, using a lot of creativity and a little humor.
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New discoveries, everyday mysteries, and the science behind the headlines

Cave nectar bat (Eonycteris spelaea) from Singapore. Justin Ng/Linfa Wang hide caption

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Justin Ng/Linfa Wang

When you listen to a story, your brain waves actually start to synchronize with those of the storyteller. And reading a narrative activates brain regions involved in deciphering or imagining a person's motives and perspective, research has found. aywan88/Getty Images hide caption

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aywan88/Getty Images

Harvard University professor Charles Lieber leaves the Moakley Federal Courthouse in Boston late last month. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

A man gets tested for diabetes at an event in Dhaka, Bangladesh, for World Diabetes Day in 2019. Mehedi Hasan/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Mehedi Hasan/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The WHO Knows Insulin Is Too Expensive. How It Plans To Drive Down The Price

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Sampson wears personal protective equipment in the lab, like these googles, which are also worn by canine law enforcement and military dogs. Doris Dahl/Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign hide caption

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Doris Dahl/Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

This transmission electron microscope image shows SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S. Virus particles are shown emerging from the surface of cells cultured in the lab. The spikes on the outer edge of the virus particles give coronaviruses their name, crown-like. NIAID-RML/NIH/Flickr hide caption

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NIAID-RML/NIH/Flickr

Coronavirus 101: What We Do — And Don't — Know About The Outbreak Of COVID-19

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Dots of orbital debris are visible in this image of the Lunar Module Challenger from the Apollo 17 spacecraft, after docking maneuvers. The debris is from the Saturn S-IVB stage separation. NASA hide caption

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NASA

People in the United States say someone is "blind as a bat" to mean that person has poor vision. James Hager/Robert Harding World Imagery/Getty Images hide caption

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James Hager/Robert Harding World Imagery/Getty Images

Myth Busting 'Blind As A Bat' And 'Memory Of A Goldfish'

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Scientists on the research vessel Akademik Fedorov spent a week or so setting up a network of scientific monitoring equipment up to about 25 miles from the MOSAiC ship. Ravenna Koenig for NPR hide caption

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Ravenna Koenig for NPR

Aluminum ingots sit stacked in a warehouse at the Port of New Orleans last year. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Art historians point to images like John Henry Fuseli's 1754 painting "The Nightmare" as early depictions of sleep paralysis. UniversalImagesGroup/Getty Images hide caption

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UniversalImagesGroup/Getty Images

Seeing Monsters? It Could Be The Nightmare Of Sleep Paralysis

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Ronald Mutyaba, an auto mechanic, at his home in Kampala, Uganda. Mutyaba is HIV positive and has developed Karposi sarcoma, a type of cancer that often affects people with immune deficiencies. He is holding a bottle of the liquid morphine that nurses from the nonprofit group Hospice Africa have prescribed to help control the pain caused by his illlness. Nurith Aizenman/NPR hide caption

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Nurith Aizenman/NPR

A Sip Of Morphine: Uganda's Old-School Solution To A Shortage Of Painkillers

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NEEDS CAPTION Smithsonian's National Zoo hide caption

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Smithsonian's National Zoo

An Afghan boy sells balloons in Kabul. We shouldn't worry about using helium for celebrations because, as one expert says, "The helium that's used in party balloons gets everybody to care about this resource." Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP hide caption

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Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP

Fallen whale carcasses, abundant in the deep-sea, are now studied as ecosystems unto themselves. Craig Smith and Mike deGruy hide caption

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Craig Smith and Mike deGruy

What Happens After A Whale Dies?

What happens after a whale dies? Their carcasses, known as "whale falls," provide a sudden, concentrated food source for organisms in the deep sea. Biologist Diva Amon is our guide through whale-fall ecosystems and the unique species that exist on these fallen whales.

What Happens After A Whale Dies?

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Psychologist Ken Carter studies why some people seek out haunted houses and other thrills — even though he's not one of them. Kay Hinton/Emory University hide caption

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Kay Hinton/Emory University

The Science Of Scary: Why It's So Fun To Be Freaked Out

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A "murder" scene could seem creepy, but what is going on inside these crows' minds may be most unsettling. Dragan Todorovic/Getty Images hide caption

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Dragan Todorovic/Getty Images

This cube of uranium metal came from a reactor that the Nazis tried to build during World War II. Hundreds of others like it are now missing. John T. Consoli/University of Maryland hide caption

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John T. Consoli/University of Maryland

An area of clear-cut logging on Prince of Wales Island, part of Alaska's Tongass National Forest. Much of the forest is dense with old-growth trees. Kevin Fleming/Corbis/VCG/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Fleming/Corbis/VCG/Getty Images

Researcher Nalini Nadkarni studies the ecology of the forest canopy. Colin Marshall/NPR hide caption

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Colin Marshall/NPR

Tree Scientist Inspires Next Generation ... Through Barbie

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Some People Get 'Brain Tingles' From These Slime Videos. What's Behind The Feeling?

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