The CRISPR Revolution Scientific advances with CRISPR
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The CRISPR Revolution

How doctors are editing genes to fight disease

As part of a clinical trial to treat sickle cell disease, Victoria Gray (center) has vials of blood drawn by nurses Bonnie Carroll (left) and Kayla Jordan at TriStar Centennial Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Gene-Edited 'Supercells' Make Progress In Fight Against Sickle Cell Disease

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As part of a clinical trial to treat sickle cell disease, Victoria Gray (center) has vials of blood drawn by nurses Bonnie Carroll (left) and Kayla Jordan at TriStar Centennial Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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CRISPR For Sickle Cell Disease Shows Promise In Early Test

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The preliminary results described Wednesday come from two patients with multiple myeloma and one with sarcoma. This was just a first safety test, the scientists say, and was not designed to measure whether such a treatment would work. Jure Gasparic/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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CRISPR Approach To Fighting Cancer Called 'Promising' In 1st Safety Test

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Scientists are exploring a new technique, called prime editing, that is more precise than CRISPR and which uses certain enzymes, including reverse transcriptase, to edit DNA. Evan Oto/Science Source hide caption

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Scientists Create New, More Powerful Technique To Edit Genes

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Although Gray will finally go home to Forest, Miss., she will return to Nashville once a month for four months to undergo blood tests and a bone marrow biopsy. But, she says, the hardest part is over. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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A Patient Hopes Gene-Editing Can Help With Pain Of Sickle Cell Disease

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Gianpiero Palermo, a professor of embryology at Weill Cornell Medicine, runs the lab where scientists are trying to use CRISPR to edit genes in human sperm. Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

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Scientists Attempt Controversial Experiment To Edit DNA In Human Sperm Using CRISPR

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Scientists In New York Are Trying To Edit The DNA In Human Sperm

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Gray was diagnosed with sickle cell disease when she was an infant. She was considering a bone marrow transplant when she heard about the CRISPR study and jumped at the chance to volunteer. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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In A 1st, Doctors In U.S. Use CRISPR Tool To Treat Patient With Genetic Disorder

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Doctors In The U.S. Use CRISPR Technique To Treat A Genetic Disorder For The 1st Time

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CRISPR technology already allows scientists to make very precise modifications to DNA, and it could revolutionize how doctors prevent and treat many diseases. But using it to create gene-edited babies is still widely considered unethical. Gregor Fischer/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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A Russian Biologist Wants To Create More Gene-Edited Babies

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Some scientists oppose a prohibition on trying to use genetically modified embryos to create babies. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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House Committee Votes To Continue Ban On Genetically Modified Babies

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The genetic variation Chinese scientist He Jiankui was trying to re-create when he edited twin girls' DNA may be more harmful than helpful to health overall, a new study says. Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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2 Chinese Babies With Edited Genes May Face Higher Risk Of Premature Death

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About two years ago, Alphonso Evans went to the hospital for what he thought was just another bladder infection and ended up in intensive care. In an effort to combat antibiotic-resistant superbugs, scientists have created "living antibiotics" made of viruses that have been genetically modified using the gene-editing tool CRISPR. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Scientists Modify Viruses With CRISPR To Create New Weapon Against Superbugs

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CRISPR gene-editing technology allows scientists to make highly precise modifications to DNA. The technology is now starting to be used in human trials to treat several diseases in the U.S. Molekuul/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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First U.S. Patients Treated With CRISPR As Human Gene-Editing Trials Get Underway

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Scientists Plan To Start Human Trials Testing CRISPR Soon

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There was an uproar in 2018 when a scientist in China, He Jiankui, announced that he had successfully used CRISPR to edit the genes of twin girls when they were embryos. Prominent scientists hope to stop further attempts at germline editing, at least for now. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Scientists Call For Global Moratorium On Creating Gene-Edited Babies

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Scientists use a microscope to see if the genetic modification is spreading. Immature modified mosquitoes glow red with yellow eyes when illuminated with a laser. Pierre Kattar for NPR hide caption

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Pierre Kattar for NPR

Genetically modified "gene drive" mosquitoes feed on warm cow's blood. Scientists hope these mosquitoes could help eradicate malaria. Pierre Kattar for NPR hide caption

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Scientists Release Controversial Genetically Modified Mosquitoes In High-Security Lab

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Scientists around the world criticized Chinese researcher He Jiankui's experimental editing of DNA in embryos that became twin girls. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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