The CRISPR Revolution Scientific advances with CRISPR
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The CRISPR Revolution

How doctors are editing genes to fight disease

Carlene Knight, who has a congenital eye disorder, volunteered to let doctors edit the genes in her retina using CRISPR. Franny White/OHSU hide caption

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Franny White/OHSU

A Gene-Editing Experiment Let These Patients With Vision Loss See Color Again

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A female Anopheles mosquito, a common vector for malaria, feeds on human skin. In a landmark study, researchers showed that genetically modified Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes could crash their own species in an environment mimicking sub-Saharan Africa, where the malaria-carrying mosquitoes spread. Dunpharlain/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Dunpharlain/Wikimedia Commons

How An Altered Strand Of DNA Can Cause Malaria-Spreading Mosquitoes To Self-Destruct

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Patrick Doherty volunteered for a new medical intervention of gene-editor infusions for the treatment of genetically-based diseases. Patrick Doherty hide caption

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Patrick Doherty

He Inherited A Devastating Disease. A CRISPR Gene-Editing Breakthrough Stopped It

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Carlene Knight, 54, is one of the first patients in a landmark study designed to try to restore vision in those who have a rare genetic disease that causes blindness. Josh Andersen/Oregon Health & Science University hide caption

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Josh Andersen/Oregon Health & Science University

Blind Patients Hope Landmark Gene-Editing Experiment Will Restore Their Vision

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Victoria Gray (second from left) with children Jamarius Wash, Jadasia Wash and Jaden Wash. Now that the gene-editing treatment has eased Gray's pain, she has been able be more active in her kids' lives and looks forward to the future. "This is really a life-changer for me," she says. Victoria Gray hide caption

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Victoria Gray

1st Patients To Get CRISPR Gene-Editing Treatment Continue To Thrive

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Victoria Gray, who underwent a landmark treatment for sickle cell disease last year, has been at home in Forest, Miss., with her three kids, Jadasia Wash (left), Jamarius Wash (second from left) and Jaden Wash. Victoria Gray hide caption

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Victoria Gray

A Year In, 1st Patient To Get Gene Editing For Sickle Cell Disease Is Thriving

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Scientists at the Casey Eye Institute, in Portland, Ore., have have injected a harmless virus containing CRISPR gene-editing instructions inside the retinal cells of a patient with a rare form of genetic blindness. KTSDesign/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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KTSDesign/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

In A 1st, Scientists Use Revolutionary Gene-Editing Tool To Edit Inside A Patient

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Victoria Gray, who has sickle cell disease, volunteered for one of the most anticipated medical experiments in decades: the first attempt to use the gene-editing technique CRISPR to treat a genetic disorder in the United States. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

A Young Mississippi Woman's Journey Through A Pioneering Gene-Editing Experiment

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As part of a clinical trial to treat sickle cell disease, Victoria Gray (center) has vials of blood drawn by nurses Bonnie Carroll (left) and Kayla Jordan at TriStar Centennial Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

CRISPR For Sickle Cell Disease Shows Promise In Early Test

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As part of a clinical trial to treat sickle cell disease, Victoria Gray (center) has vials of blood drawn by nurses Bonnie Carroll (left) and Kayla Jordan at TriStar Centennial Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Gene-Edited 'Supercells' Make Progress In Fight Against Sickle Cell Disease

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The preliminary results described Wednesday come from two patients with multiple myeloma and one with sarcoma. This was just a first safety test, the scientists say, and was not designed to measure whether such a treatment would work. Jure Gasparic/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Jure Gasparic/EyeEm/Getty Images

CRISPR Approach To Fighting Cancer Called 'Promising' In 1st Safety Test

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Scientists are exploring a new technique, called prime editing, that is more precise than CRISPR and which uses certain enzymes, including reverse transcriptase, to edit DNA. Evan Oto/Science Source hide caption

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Evan Oto/Science Source

Scientists Create New, More Powerful Technique To Edit Genes

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Scientists use a microscope to see if the genetic modification is spreading. Immature modified mosquitoes glow red with yellow eyes when illuminated with a laser. Pierre Kattar for NPR hide caption

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Pierre Kattar for NPR

Although Gray will finally go home to Forest, Miss., she will return to Nashville once a month for four months to undergo blood tests and a bone marrow biopsy. But, she says, the hardest part is over. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

A Patient Hopes Gene-Editing Can Help With Pain Of Sickle Cell Disease

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Scientists In New York Are Trying To Edit The DNA In Human Sperm

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Gianpiero Palermo, a professor of embryology at Weill Cornell Medicine, runs the lab where scientists are trying to use CRISPR to edit genes in human sperm. Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

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Elias Williams for NPR

Scientists Attempt Controversial Experiment To Edit DNA In Human Sperm Using CRISPR

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Doctors In The U.S. Use CRISPR Technique To Treat A Genetic Disorder For The 1st Time

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Gray was diagnosed with sickle cell disease when she was an infant. She was considering a bone marrow transplant when she heard about the CRISPR study and jumped at the chance to volunteer. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

In A 1st, Doctors In U.S. Use CRISPR Tool To Treat Patient With Genetic Disorder

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CRISPR technology already allows scientists to make very precise modifications to DNA, and it could revolutionize how doctors prevent and treat many diseases. But using it to create gene-edited babies is still widely considered unethical. Gregor Fischer/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Gregor Fischer/picture alliance via Getty Images

A Russian Biologist Wants To Create More Gene-Edited Babies

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Some scientists oppose a prohibition on trying to use genetically modified embryos to create babies. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

House Committee Votes To Continue Ban On Genetically Modified Babies

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