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Saving The World, One Invention At A Time

N95 respirator manufactured by 3M Joe Palca/NPR hide caption

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Joe Palca/NPR

Respirators Key To Coronavirus Battle But They Must Be Worn Correctly

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Research & Development associate Divya Nagalati works on cell cultures in Regeneron's infectious disease labs in Tarrytown, N.Y. The firm is looking for tailored antibodies that might prove useful against the new coronavirus. Rani Levy hide caption

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Rani Levy

Hunt For New Coronavirus Treatments Includes Gene-Silencing And Monoclonal Antibodies

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In The Fight Against COVID-19, Labs Look To Create Coronavirus Antibodies

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DARPA

DARPA Aims To Have Coronavirus Therapy Shortly After Outbreak's Start

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Paul McKay, a molecular immunologist at the Imperial College School of Medicine in London, checks a dish of bacteria containing genetic material from the new coronavirus. He and his team are testing a candidate vaccine. Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. Government Is Sharing Its Test For The New Coronavirus

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The State Of A Potential Vaccine For The New Coronavirus

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Susanna M. Hamilton/Broad Communications

Molecular Scissors Could Help Keep Some Viral Illnesses At Bay

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An app uses a smartphone camera to detect leukocoria, a pale reflection from the back of the eye. It can be an early sign of disease. Here it appears light brown compared the healthy eye. Munson et al., Sci. Adv. 2019; 5 eaax 6363 hide caption

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Munson et al., Sci. Adv. 2019; 5 eaax 6363

An App That Can Catch Early Signs Of Eye Disease In A Flash

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Water utilities need quick ways to check for contamination in the drinking water supply, including from norovirus, which causes intestinal distress. Scientists are trying to make it easier to test for the virus. Rehan Hasan / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Rehan Hasan / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

A Speedy Test For Norovirus Could Help Water Supplies Check For Contamination

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