The Coronavirus Crisis Everything you need to know about the global pandemic.
The novel coronavirus, first detected at the end of 2019, has caused a global pandemic.
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The Coronavirus Crisis

Everything you need to know about the global pandemic

A British Airways plane comes in to land behind a tail fin at Heathrow Airport in London. On Friday, the head of the group that owns BA called for instituting an electronic health pass for passengers as the company announced steep losses due to COVID-19. Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP hide caption

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Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

Congressional Democrats have included some of their longtime legislative priorities in the $1.9 trillion COVID relief package. Republicans accuse it of being an expensive liberal wish list; Democrats say they want a New Deal for the present era. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in partnership with Boston Children's Hospital and Castlight Health launched a new tool that allows Americans to search for COVID-19 vaccine providers with stock of vaccine where they live. Michele Abercrombie/NPR hide caption

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Michele Abercrombie/NPR

CDC Launches Web Tool To Help Americans Find COVID-19 Vaccines

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President Joe Biden, pictured on the campaign trail in Nov. 2020, has long encouraged Americans to mask up in the fight against COVID-19. On Wednesday, his administration announced it will provide 25 million masks to community health centers and food banks across the country. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP
Andrea D'Aquino for NPR

Millions Of Kids Learn English At School. Teaching Them Remotely Hasn't Been Easy

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A shipment of COVID-19 vaccines from the COVAX global program arrived at the Kotoka International Airport in Accra on Wednesday, as Ghana received the group's first vaccine shipment. Nipah Dennis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nipah Dennis/AFP via Getty Images

A health care worker looks away as she's immunized with Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine at Klerksdorp Hospital in Klerksdorp, South Africa, on Feb. 18. Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images

Concierge health care provider One Medical allowed patients who were not eligible — and those with connections to the company's leadership — to skip the COVID-19 vaccine line ahead of high-risk patients. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

High-End Medical Provider Let Ineligible People Skip COVID-19 Vaccine Line

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Dr. Rochelle Walensky likens the call she got from the Biden team, asking her to lead the CDC amid a pandemic, to a hospital alarm that goes off when a patient's heart has stopped. "I got called during a code," she says. "And when you get called during a code, your job is to be there to help." Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Biden's Straight-Talking CDC Director Has Long Used Data To Save Lives

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Top left: An officer asks people to observe lockdown rules in Brighton, England. Bottom left: A protester at a lockdown demonstration in Brussels, Belgium last month. Top right: Malaysian health officers screen passengers with a thermal scanner at Kuala Lumpur Airport in January 2020. Bottom right: Employees eat their lunch in Wuhan, China, in March 2020. Luke Dray/Getty Images; Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP via Getty Images; Mohd Rasfan/AFP; Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Dray/Getty Images; Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP via Getty Images; Mohd Rasfan/AFP; Getty Images

Anne Cook sits with her husband, Jack Cook, as he receives his second dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine during a mass vaccination event in the parking lot of Coors Field on Saturday in Denver, Colo. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

Optimism About Case Rates, Vaccines, And Future Of The Pandemic

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People wait in front of the hospital of the Military Medical Academy in Sofia, Bulgaria, on Feb. 21 for a COVID-19 vaccination. NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell testifies during a House Financial Services Committee hearing on Dec. 2, 2020. Powell appeared before the Senate Banking Committee on Tuesday and argued the U.S. economy still has a long way to go to recover millions of lost jobs. Jim Lo Scalzo/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Lo Scalzo/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Fed Chair Jerome Powell Warns Of Long Road Ahead To Recover Millions Of Lost Jobs

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At a Kedren Community Health Center vaccine clinic in South Central Los Angeles this month, 89-year-old Cecilia Onwytalu (center) signals she's more than ready to get her immunization against COVID-19. Apu Gomes/Getty Images hide caption

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Apu Gomes/Getty Images

Race Versus Time: Targeting Vaccine To The Most Vulnerable Is No Speedy Task

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Visitors wear masks at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in October. The museum's director says the Met is considering selling art to pay for operating expenses. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

The Met Considers Selling Its Art To Stave Off Financial Shortfall

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The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine in Edinburg, Texas, last year. The Rio Grande Valley, a four-county region that stretches across Texas's southernmost tip, remains one of America's most afflicted areas, with the highest hospitalization rates, deaths at more than twice the state average, overwhelmed hospitals and refrigerated trucks serving as back-up morgues. Callaghan O'Hare/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Callaghan O'Hare/Bloomberg via Getty Images

President Biden, first lady Jill Biden, Vice President Harris and second gentleman Doug Emhoff hold a moment of silence and candlelight ceremony in honor of those who have lost their lives to the coronavirus. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Kurtis Smith gives the Moderna coronavirus vaccine to a resident at Red Hook Neighborhood Senior Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., on Monday. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Why The Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Has Gotten A Bad Rap — And Why That's Not Fair

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