The Coronavirus Crisis Everything you need to know about the global pandemic.
The novel coronavirus, first detected at the end of 2019, has caused a global pandemic.
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The Coronavirus Crisis

Everything you need to know about the global pandemic

White House COVID-19 Response Coordinator Dr. Ashish Jha has urged all Americans to take the new COVID-19 Bivalent vaccine booster. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Are We Ready for Another COVID Surge?

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Gearing up for fall, health officials are recommending a new round of booster shots. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Omicron boosters: Do I need one, and if so, when?

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The Biden administration plans to offer updated booster shots in the fall. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Summer boosters for people under 50 shelved in favor of updated boosters in the fall

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A selfie of Beth Kenny (foreground), their wife Adina (middle), and their child Vyla sitting in their backyard in Alameda, Calif. Since the lifting of COVID safety measures, Kenny and their family have had to pull back from indoor activities, and they struggle to explain why to Vyla. Beth Kenny hide caption

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Beth Kenny

On Wednesday, May 4th, 2022 a mix of masked and unmasked individuals shop at the Portland Farmers Market in Shemanski Park in Portland, OR. Leah Nash/The Washington Post / Getty Images hide caption

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Leah Nash/The Washington Post / Getty Images

BA.5: The Omicron Subvariant Driving Up Cases — And Reinfections

BA.5 is now the dominant SARS-CoV-2 subvariant in the United States. It's driving up COVID cases and hospitalizations across the country.

BA.5: The Omicron Subvariant Driving Up Cases — And Reinfections

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A Covid-19 testing site stands on a Brooklyn street corner in April. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A new dominant omicron strain in the U.S. is driving up cases — and reinfections

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Teachers across the country report high levels of stress and burnout after a school year marked by protests, Covid surges and gun violence. (Photo by Jon Cherry/Getty Images) Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Teachers Reflect on a Tough School Year: 'It's Been Very Stressful'

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A child receives the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine at the Fairfax County Government Center in Annandale, Va., last November. Vaccines will soon be available for children as young as 6 months old. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A child receives the Pfizer BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at the Fairfax County Government Center in Annandale, Va., in November 2021. A committee of advisers to the Food and Drug Administration recommended Wednesday that the agency expand authorization of COVID-19 vaccines to children as young as 6-months-old. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Advisers to the FDA back COVID vaccines for the youngest children

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Flags at the base of the Washington Monument fly at half staff to mark one 1 million deaths attributed to COVID-19. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

How Many Of America's One Million COVID Deaths Were Preventable?

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A Covid-19 testing van stands in Times Square on May 03, 2022 in New York City. Health officials announced on Monday that New York City will raise its COVID alert level to medium. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A mask is seen on the ground at John F. Kennedy Airport on April 19, 2022 in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Dr. Anthony Fauci, chief medical adviser to President Biden, cites the U.S. vaccination program and previous widespread transmission of the coronavirus as reasons why the U.S. is not now under pandemic conditions. Here, travelers wait at Miami International Airport last week after mask requirements were lifted. Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images

People arrive at a COVID-19 testing station in Houston, Texas, on Jan. 7. Texans were rushing to get tested as the state experienced an unprecedented spike in infections from the omicron variant. Francois Picard/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Francois Picard/AFP via Getty Images

Travelers walk through Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Arlington, Virginia, on April 19, 2022. Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images