The Coronavirus Crisis Everything you need to know about the global pandemic.
The novel coronavirus, first detected at the end of 2019, has caused a global pandemic.
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The Coronavirus Crisis

Everything you need to know about the global pandemic

Laura Sifuentes lives in Rosedale, Miss. The government's Child Tax Credit, a monthly payment for many American parents with kids, helped her financially when she had to give up her job to care of her kids, nieces and nephews during the pandemic. Stephan Bisaha/Gulf States Newsroom/Stephan Bisaha/Gulf States Newsroom hide caption

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Stephan Bisaha/Gulf States Newsroom/Stephan Bisaha/Gulf States Newsroom

Why many Americans continue to struggle despite trillions of dollars in pandemic aid

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Teacher burnout and thinning substitute teacher rolls combined with the continuing fallout of the winter surge is pushing public school leaders to the brink of desperation. Lawmakers are responding by temporarily rewriting hiring rules. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Trash sits out for collection on a Philadelphia street on Thursday. The omicron variant is sickening so many sanitation workers that waste collection in Philadelphia and other cities has been delayed or suspended. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Employees of the Miami-Dade Public Library System distribute Covid-19 home rapid test kits in Miami, Florida, on January 8, 2022. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Why COVID Tests Are Still So Scarce And Expensive — And When That Could Change

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A protester holds a sign outside of Parliament in London after the weekly Prime Minister's Questions session, in which Boris Johnson said he joined staff for an outdoor party at 10 Downing Street in May 2020. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Consumer prices — including gas — are surging at their highest annual pace in around 40 years. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Inflation is still surging and some Democrats see one culprit: Greedy companies

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A woman checks in for her flight at a United Airlines counter at Dulles International Airport on December 27, 2021. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

A medical worker puts on a mask before entering a negative pressure room with a COVID-19 patient in the ICU ward at UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester, Mass., last week. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Remembering an Arizona grandmother and uncle who died of COVID

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White House adviser discusses U.S. coronavirus testing shortages

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Viruses evolve and weaken over time — what does that mean for the coronavirus?

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Hospitalization rates among children are at their highest since the pandemic start

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Mental health professionals have advice for handling another pandemic winter

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A booster dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine is prepared during a vaccination clinic on Dec. 29 in Lawrence, Mass. The FDA is now shortening the wait time between the second dose and the booster to five months from six months. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

A sign seeking workers is displayed at a fast food restaurant in Portland, Ore., on Dec. 27, 2021. Jenny Kane/AP hide caption

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Jenny Kane/AP

Employers added only 199,000 jobs in December even before omicron started to surge

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Children have become masters at the temperature check. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

Kids Under 5 Still Can't Get Vaccinated. What The Omicron Surge Means For Them

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A health worker administers a dose of a Moderna COVID-19 vaccine during a vaccination clinic at the Norristown Public Health Center in Norristown, Pa., Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2021. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP