The Coronavirus Crisis Everything you need to know about the global pandemic.
The novel coronavirus, first detected at the end of 2019, has caused a global pandemic.
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The Coronavirus Crisis

Everything you need to know about the global pandemic

Biochemist Jennifer Doudna, the subject of Walter Isaacson's new biography The Code Breaker, shared a Nobel prize in chemistry in 2020 for the part she played in developing the CRISPR gene editing technology. Nick Otto/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Nick Otto/The Washington Post via Getty Images

CRISPR Scientist's Biography Explores Ethics Of Rewriting The Code Of Life

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As the U.S. accelerates its rollout of COVID-19 vaccines, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Monday released new guidance for individuals who have been fully inoculated. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

Syrian President Bashar Assad gestures while speaking to Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov during talks in Damascus in September. Assad and his wife, Asma, have been diagnosed with coronavirus infection, according to an official statement. Russian Foreign Ministry Press Service/AP hide caption

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Russian Foreign Ministry Press Service/AP

Edith Arangoitia receives a COVID-19 vaccination in Chelsea, Mass., a heavily Hispanic community, on Feb. 16. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Misinformation And Mistrust Among The Obstacles Latinos Face In Getting Vaccinated

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A store in New York City stands closed on April 21, 2020. A year after the coronavirus pandemic was declared, millions of Americans are still unemployed. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

'Why Us?': A Year After Being Laid Off, Millions Are Still Unemployed

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Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks to the press Saturday at the Capitol, after the Senate passed COVID-19 relief legislation on a party-line vote. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Agnes Boisvert, an ICU nurse at St. Luke's hospital in downtown Boise, Idaho, spends every day trying to navigate between two worlds. One is a swirl of beeping monitors, masked emotion and death; the other, she says, seems oblivious to the horrors occurring every hour of every day. Isabel Seliger for NPR hide caption

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Isabel Seliger for NPR

A woman walks past a closed flower shop in Berlin on Thursday. A research group noted more than 1,200 new words in German inspired by the pandemic. Tobias Schwarz/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tobias Schwarz/AFP via Getty Images

Pandemic Inspires More Than 1,200 New German Words

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Disneyland, Anaheim, Calif., September 2020. California announced theme parks, sports arenas and stadiums will be allowed to open on April 1 if they meet health requirements at the county level. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Boxes containing vials of the Janssen COVID-19 vaccine sit in a container before being transported to a refrigeration unit at Louisville Metro Health and Wellness headquarters on March 4 in Louisville, Ky. The FDA approved the third COVID-19 vaccine on Feb. 27. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

1 Shot Or 2 Shots? 'The Vaccine That's Available To You — Get That'

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Four-year-old Lois Copley-Jones, the photographer's daughter, takes part in a livestreamed broadcast of "PE With Joe" on March 23, 2020, in Newcastle-under-Lyme, England. The popular fitness series ended Friday. Gareth Copley/Getty Images hide caption

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Gareth Copley/Getty Images

As Schools Reopen, Popular 'PE With Joe' Online Exercise Class Goes Bye-Bye

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