The Coronavirus Crisis Everything you need to know about the global pandemic.
The novel coronavirus, first detected at the end of 2019, has caused a global pandemic.
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The Coronavirus Crisis

Everything you need to know about the global pandemic

In Nashville, Tenn., a sign reminds visitors to wear masks at Belmont University, which is preparing to host Thursday's presidential debate. Federal health officials say a new study highlights the need for masks. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Passengers wear face masks at Tocumen International Airport in Panama City on Oct. 12. STR/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP via Getty Images

From Air Travel to Hospital Treatment, We're Still Learning About The Virus

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The University of Michigan football stadium is shown in Ann Arbor, Mich., this summer. Health officials in Michigan say infections among university students account for over 60% of local infections. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

Artist Don Becker creates automatons after being laid off from his job during the pandemic. This mechanical sculpture features a woodcutter being thwarted by trees. Barry Gordemer/NPR hide caption

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Barry Gordemer/NPR

Automatons Keep Gears Turning In D.C. Artist's Brain During The Pandemic

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Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, is pictured on Sept. 9 on Capitol Hill. Collins says a vaccine would not be approved for emergency use before late November at the earliest. Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images

NIH Director 'Guardedly Optimistic' About COVID-19 Vaccine Approval By End Of 2020

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Joyce Chen, an associate professor of development economics at Ohio State University, has had to put her research on hold this year to oversee her children's virtual schooling. Chen is also teaching virtually this fall. Jessica Phelps for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Phelps for NPR

Even The Most Successful Women Pay A Big Price In Pandemic

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Voters drop off their ballots at an official ballot drop-box in Orange County, Calif., earlier this month. More than 35 million people have already cast their votes, with two weeks to go before Election Day. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Election FAQs: Postmark Deadlines, Ballot Security And How To Track Your Vote

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COVID-19 mortality rates are going down, according to studies of two large hospital systems, partly thanks to improvements in treatment. Here, clinicians care for a patient in July at an El Centro, Calif., hospital. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Studies Point To Big Drop In COVID-19 Death Rates

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Hawaiian Airlines jets outside Daniel K. Inouye International Airport in Honolulu. Hawaii has seen a more than 90% reduction in the number of air travelers arriving since the start of the pandemic. Ryan Finnerty/Hawaii Public Radio hide caption

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Ryan Finnerty/Hawaii Public Radio

Facing Economic Devastation, Hawaii Attempts To Revive Tourism

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A health care worker prepares to screen people for the coronavirus at a testing site in Landover, Md., in March. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Health Care Workers Ask Therapist: 'Why Aren't More People Taking This Seriously?'

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Shoppers buy face masks on O'Connell Street in Dublin, Ireland, on Tuesday. Ireland's government is putting the country at its highest level of coronavirus restrictions for six weeks in a bid to combat a rise in infections. Niall Carson/AP hide caption

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Niall Carson/AP

The study is still awaiting final regulatory approval. If given the green light, a study in which human volunteers will be infected with the coronavirus will begin in January at a biosecure unit at London's Royal Free Hospital. Kirsty O'Connor/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Kirsty O'Connor/PA Images via Getty Images

Recruiting patients for medical studies has been challenging during the pandemic, especially older people who are more vulnerable to COVID-19. Getty Images hide caption

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A Big Alzheimer's Drug Study Is Proceeding Cautiously Despite The Pandemic

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Passengers enter a checkpoint at O'Hare International Airport on Monday. The TSA reports it screened over 1 million passengers on Sunday, the highest number since the coronavirus crisis began. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

The U.S.-Canada border at Pittsburg, N.H., in 2017. The U.S. borders with Canada and Mexico will stay closed to nonessential travel through Nov. 21. Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images

More than 1,000,000 Americans left the workforce in September. About 80% of them were women. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

The Economy Is Driving Women Out Of The Workforce And Some May Not Return

Women are dropping out of the workforce in much higher numbers than men. Valerie Wilson of the Economic Policy Institute explains that women are overrepresented in jobs that have been hit hardest by the pandemic and child care has gotten harder to come by.

The Economy Is Driving Women Out Of The Workforce And Some May Not Return

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