The Coronavirus Crisis Everything you need to know about the global pandemic.
The novel coronavirus, first detected at the end of 2019, has caused a global pandemic.
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The Coronavirus Crisis

Everything you need to know about the global pandemic

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases, is pictured in a hearing on July 31. He is testifying on Wednesday alongside other top health officials in a Senate panel hearing. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Huda Mohamed, a student at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va., has an immunodeficiency. She decided to take extra precautions by using Virginia's COVIDWISE app, which alerts users who may have been exposed to the coronavirus. Such apps are only available in a few states. Eman Mohammed for NPR hide caption

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Eman Mohammed for NPR

A former CDC official criticizes the agency over its latest reversal, this time in guidance on how the coronavirus is transmitted. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

After Aerosols Misstep, Former CDC Official Criticizes Agency Over Unclear Messaging

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's guidelines for a safe Halloween during the COVID-19 pandemic include new methods of doing classic spooky activities. ArtMarie/Getty Images hide caption

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ArtMarie/Getty Images

Nurse Kathe Olmstead (right) gives volunteer Melissa Harting an injection in a study of a possible COVID-19 vaccine developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc. Hans Pennink/AP hide caption

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Hans Pennink/AP

With Limited COVID-19 Vaccine Doses, Who Would Get Them First?

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The U.S. hit a tragic milestone Tuesday, recording more than 200,000 coronavirus deaths. Here, Chris Duncan, whose 75-year-old mother, Constance, died from COVID-19 on her birthday, visits a COVID Memorial Project installation of 20,000 U.S. flags on the National Mall. The flags are on the grounds of the Washington Monument, facing the White House. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

A worker pushes a cart past refrigerators at a Home Depot in Boston in January, before the coronavirus pandemic threw a monkey wrench into the supply and demand of major appliances. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Why It's So Hard To Buy A New Refrigerator These Days

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The NFL has fined San Francisco 49ers head coach Kyle Shanahan and two other coaches for not following rules about keeping their faces covered. Here, Shanahan walks off the field after his team's Sept. 13 game against the Arizona Cardinals. MSA/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images hide caption

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MSA/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

In this image taken from video, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson makes a statement to the House of Commons on the state of the COVID-19 pandemic. House of Commons/AP hide caption

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House of Commons/AP

More than 65% of the nation's small, rural hospitals took out loans from Medicare when the pandemic hit. Many now face repayment at a time when they are under great financial strain. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Dr. Joseph Varon notifies the family of a patient who died inside the coronavirus unit at Houston's United Memorial Medical Center on July 6. Varon tells NPR he's "living on adrenaline." David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Emergency medics from the Houston Fire Department try to save the life of a nursing home resident in cardiac arrest on August 12 in Houston, Texas. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

With Nearly 200,000 Dead, Health Care Workers Struggle To Endure

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention briefly posted new guidance to its website stating that the coronavirus can commonly be transmitted through aerosol particles, which can be produced by activities like singing. Here, choristers wear face masks during a music festival in southwestern France in July. Bob Edme/AP hide caption

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Bob Edme/AP

If the U.K.'s rate of new coronavirus cases doubles four more times, Chief Scientific Advisor Sir Patrick Vallance said, "you would end up with something like 50,000 cases in the middle of October per day." 10 Downing Street hide caption

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10 Downing Street

The U.S. Capitol, seen here on April 13, remains closed to public tours and open only to members, staff, press and official business visitors. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images