The Coronavirus Crisis Everything you need to know about the global pandemic.
The novel coronavirus, first detected at the end of 2019, has caused a global pandemic.
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The Coronavirus Crisis

Everything you need to know about the global pandemic

The U.S. Capitol, seen here on April 13, remains closed to public tours and open only to members, staff, press and official business visitors. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Cars line up for coronavirus tests at the University of Texas at El Paso on Oct. 23. The city has seen a surge in cases, prompting a judge to issue a shutdown of nonessential businesses. Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images

Frank Lloyd Wright's Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York City on April 16, 2016. Raymond Boyd/Getty Images hide caption

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Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

Guggenheim's Audio Guide Brings The Art Museum To Listeners' 'Mind's Eye'

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The ICU at Tampa General Hospital in Tampa, Fla., was 99% full this week, according to an internal report produced by the federal government. It's among numerous hospitals the report highlighted with ICUs filled to over 90% capacity. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Internal Documents Reveal COVID-19 Hospitalization Data The Government Keeps Hidden

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Suffolk County Executive Steven Bellone announced fines on Wednesday against a Long Island, N.Y., country club and a resident for hosting events in violation of social-gathering limits. Screen grab by NPR/Suffolk County Executive/Facebook hide caption

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Screen grab by NPR/Suffolk County Executive/Facebook

An employee adjusts desks in an empty classroom in New Delhi after schools there were closed in March. A new report finds 1 in 4 countries have either missed their planned school reopening date, or not yet set one. Yawar Nazir/Getty Images hide caption

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Yawar Nazir/Getty Images

People enjoy eating outdoors on Wednesday in Melbourne, Australia. Lockdown restrictions in the city were lifted after 111 days, allowing people to leave their home for any reason. Darrian Traynor/Getty Images hide caption

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Darrian Traynor/Getty Images

Illinois Gov. JB Pritzker answers questions from the media, along with Dr. Ngozi Ezike, director of the Illinois Department of Public Health, during his daily press briefing on the COVID-19 pandemic on May 22, in Springfield, Ill. Justin L. Fowler/AP hide caption

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Justin L. Fowler/AP

The U.S. flag hangs outside the New York Stock Exchange earlier this month. Investors have been grappling with a wave of uncertainty that's sent the market lower in recent weeks. Frank Franklin II/AP hide caption

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Frank Franklin II/AP

Dow Plunges 943 Points; Steep Sell-Off Is Triggered By Fears Of More Lockdowns

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The number of women in the workforce overtook men for a brief period earlier this year. But the uncomfortable truth is that in their homes, women are still fitting into stereotypical roles of doing the bulk of cooking, cleaning and parenting. It's another form of systemic inequality within a 21st century home that the pandemic is laying bare. Malte Mueller/fStop/Getty Images hide caption

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Malte Mueller/fStop/Getty Images

A store advertises discounts in Santa Monica, Calif., on July 28 amid the coronavirus pandemic. Economic growth data on Thursday are expected to show a record-setting figure for the third quarter, but that covers the more worrisome picture underneath the surface. Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images

Used vehicles are parked on the sales lot at a CarMax store on Sept. 24 in Colma, Calif. CarMax reported a surge in earnings after used-car prices climbed steadily — and surprisingly — for months. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Increasingly, many people in the U.S., like these teens in a Miami grocery story in August, now routinely wear face masks in public to help stop COVID-19's spread. But social distancing and other public health measures have been slower to catch on, especially among young adults, a national survey finds. Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

An employee takes a pile of chairs inside a closing bar on the Place du Capitole in Toulouse, France on Saturday. Coronavirus cases in the country just topped a million, and there's a new government-imposed curfew. In large parts of the France you can't be out after 9 p.m. Fred Scheiber/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Scheiber/AFP via Getty Images

Coronavirus Cases Are Surging Past The Summer Peak — And Not Just In The U.S.

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