The Coronavirus Crisis Everything you need to know about the global pandemic.
The novel coronavirus, first detected at the end of 2019, has caused a global pandemic.
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The Coronavirus Crisis

Everything you need to know about the global pandemic

North Korean State Commission of Quality Management staff in protective gear carries a disinfectant spray can as personnel check the health of travelers and inspect goods delivered via the borders at the Pyongyang Airport in North Korea, on Feb. 1. Jon Chol Jin/AP hide caption

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Jon Chol Jin/AP

The American Academy of Pediatrics is calling on researchers to broaden their COVID-19 vaccine trials to include more children. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

A COVID-19 Vaccine For Children May Still Be Many Months Away

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"You do what you have to do to survive," says Diane Evans, who is fighting pandemic loneliness with technology. Evans lives in San Francisco and has Zoom calls regularly with her daughter in Chicago. Lesley McClurg/KQED hide caption

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Lesley McClurg/KQED

Performers dance along 34th Street during a pre-taping of the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in front of the flagship store in New York City on Nov. 25. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

Mark Andrews, right, of the Baltimore Ravens hurdles Devin Bush, left, of the Pittsburgh Steelers during the first quarter at Heinz Field on Oct. 6, 2019 in Pittsburgh. This season, the Thanksgiving matchup between the two teams has been canceled due to a coronavirus outbreak. Joe Sargent/Getty Images hide caption

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Medical staff prepare for an intubation procedure on a COVID-19 patient in a Houston intensive care unit. In some parts of the U.S., as hospitals get crowded, hospital leaders are worried they may need to implement crisis standards of care. Go Nakamura/Getty Images hide caption

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Go Nakamura/Getty Images

The beauty of these apple hand pies from recipe developer Sohla El-Waylyy is how easy they are, especially because they call for pre-made pie dough. Sohla El-Waylly hide caption

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Sohla El-Waylly

A Feast For A Few: Rethinking The Traditional Thanksgiving Meal

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A temporary tent was set up at UMass Memorial Hospital in Worcester, Mass., to prepare for an uptick in COVID-19 cases this month. Erin Clark/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Erin Clark/Boston Globe via Getty Images

An inmate from the El Paso County detention facility prepares to load bodies wrapped in plastic into a refrigerated temporary morgue trailer. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

A protester holds a sign to protest measures in Miami to close indoor seating amid a rise in coronavirus cases. The number of unemployment claims rose for a second week, reinforcing concerns about the economy. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The U.S. Capitol has been hit by the coronavirus like the rest of the country, grappling with protective measures and multiple cases. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Illinois Department of Veterans' Affairs, led by Linda Chapa LaVia, shown here in 2018, has ordered an independent investigation into a coronavirus outbreak at a veterans' home. John O'Connor/AP hide caption

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John O'Connor/AP
Yulia Reznikov/Getty Images

As COVID-19 Vaccine Nears, Employers Consider Making It Mandatory

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A flu vaccine is administered at a walk-up COVID-19 testing site, in San Fernando, Calif. Emergency use authorization is expected soon for vaccines for COVID-19. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Ernest Grant, the president of the American Nurses Association, is taking part in a Moderna coronavirus vaccine trial. He says he wants to increase trust in science. Joel Saget/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joel Saget/AFP via Getty Images

Black People Are More Hesitant About A Vaccine. A Leading Nurse Wants To Change That

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With new infections rising across the country, states are struggling to slow the spread, and testing can barely keep up. Here, people line up outside a coronavirus testing site this month in New York. Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images

To truly turn the current surge in coronavirus cases around, epidemiologists say governments need to do more than just order people not to see friends and family. mathisworks/Getty Images hide caption

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Epidemiologist Says Restricting Small Gatherings Isn't Enough To Stop The Surge

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