The Coronavirus Crisis Everything you need to know about the global pandemic.
The novel coronavirus, first detected at the end of 2019, has caused a global pandemic.
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The Coronavirus Crisis

Everything you need to know about the global pandemic

Jeff Zients, the White House COVID-19 response coordinator, and Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, brief reporters in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House on Tuesday after two government agencies recommended a pause in the distribution of Johnson & Johnson's single-dose COVID-19 vaccine. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The J & J Pause, Explained — And What It Means For The U.S. Vaccination Effort

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Consumer prices jumped in March, marking a return of inflation, but the Federal Reserve insists any uptick will be temporary. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

Consumer Prices Jumped. Should You Worry? That's Sparking A Heated Debate

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A mass vaccination site at the Lumen Field Event Center in Seattle had plenty of takers for the COVID-19 vaccine when it opened in mid-March. Though some relatively rare cases of coronavirus infection have been documented despite vaccination, "I don't see anything that changes our concept of the vaccine and its efficacy," says Dr. Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health. Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

CDC Studies 'Breakthrough' COVID Cases Among People Already Vaccinated

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Two Centers for Disease Control and Prevention studies released Monday shed new light on the racial and ethnic disparities in hospitalizations and emergency visits related to COVID-19 last year. Blake Nissen/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Blake Nissen/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Lines form in front of a vaccination center Monday in Hamburg, Germany. Marcus Brandt/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Marcus Brandt/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images

Germany Is Expected To Centralize Its COVID-19 Response. Some Fear It May Be Too Late

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Dr. Hassan Bencheqroun, an interventional pulmonary and critical care physician, has seen firsthand the impact of COVID-19 on Arab communities in the San Diego area. Hassan Bencheqroun hide caption

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Hassan Bencheqroun
Susan Haejin Lee for NPR

More Colleges Say They'll Require Students To Have COVID-19 Vaccines For Fall

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Doses of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine will drop by 86% next week after one of the company's manufacturers released a stockpile and those have been distributed. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Pharmacist intern Ojashwi Giri hands a vaccination card to Linda Simansky, at Union Pharmacy in Newton, Mass. It's a kind of low-tech version of "vaccine passports" that have become the latest pandemic wedge issue. Tovia Smith/NPR hide caption

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Tovia Smith/NPR

Vaccine Passports: 'Scarlet Letter' Or Just The Ticket?

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CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky, seen last week at FEMA mass vaccination site in Boston, said Thursday that the CDC is taking steps to address the impact of racism on public health. Erin Clark/Getty Images hide caption

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Erin Clark/Getty Images

European Court of Human Rights President Robert Spano delivered the court's ruling on vaccine mandates, saying the benefits of such laws outweigh the intrusion into privacy. European Court of Human Rights/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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European Court of Human Rights/Screenshot by NPR

Public opinion polls reveal fear of COVID-19 is waning, as more Americans than ever travel during the pandemic. That's fueling debate about vaccine passports. Kamil Krzaczynski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kamil Krzaczynski/AFP via Getty Images

Amid Record Pandemic Travel, What's Safe? And The Debate Over Vaccine Passports

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On Wednesday, pharmacists at the West Wales General Hospital in Carmarthen, Wales, transport a cool box containing the first batch of Moderna vaccines being distributed in Britain. Jacob King/AP hide caption

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Jacob King/AP

CDC Says More Virulent British Strain Of Coronavirus Now Dominant In U.S.

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Deaths from COVID-19 are often due to the immune system overreacting to the coronavirus. New drugs to suppress that reaction are showing promise, say researchers. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

Drugs Targeting Immune Response To COVID-19 Show Promise

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Nearly a third of adults in the U.S. have gotten at least one shot of the COVID-19 vaccine so far, but researchers warn that vaccine refusal may keep the country from reaching herd immunity. John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Vaccine Refusal May Put Herd Immunity At Risk, Researchers Warn

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The European Union's drug regulator on Wednesday announced its findings into the possible connection between AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine and rare blood clots. Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

EU Regulator: AstraZeneca Vaccine Effective; Blood Clots May Be A Rare Side Effect

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