The Coronavirus Crisis Everything you need to know about the global pandemic.
The novel coronavirus, first detected at the end of 2019, has caused a global pandemic.
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The Coronavirus Crisis

Everything you need to know about the global pandemic

Jonathan Caballero is among the millions of workers who are rethinking how they want to live their lives after the pandemic. He has found a new job that won't require a long commute. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

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Andrea Hsu/NPR

As The Pandemic Recedes, Millions Of Workers Are Saying 'I Quit'

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A COVID-19 vaccination clinic last month in Auburn, Maine. A drop in life expectancy in the U.S. stems largely from the coronavirus pandemic, a new study says. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

The Pandemic Led To The Biggest Drop In U.S. Life Expectancy Since WWII, Study Finds

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After experiencing a suicidal crisis earlier this year, Melinda, a Massachusetts 13-year-old, was forced to remain 17 days in the local hospital's emergency room while she waited for a space to open up at a psychiatric treatment facility. She was only allowed to use her phone an hour a day in the ER; her mom visited daily, bringing books and special foods. Photo courtesy of Pam, Melinda's mother hide caption

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Photo courtesy of Pam, Melinda's mother

President Biden directed the intelligence agencies to look for evidence of an accident at the Wuhan Institute of Virology (pictured) that could have lead to the spread of the coronavirus. Many scientists still think its more likely the virus came from the wild. Hector Retamal /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal /AFP via Getty Images

The Unproven Lab Leak Theory Puts Pressure On China — But It May Backfire

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U.S. President Joe Biden (left) speaks as Vice President Kamala Harris (right) listens during an event in the South Court Auditorium of the White House. President Biden spoke on the COVID-19 response and the vaccination program announcing new incentives including free beer, free childcare and free sports tickets to push Americans to get vaccinated before July 4th. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

COVID-19 Vaccines, Boosters And The Renaissance In Vaccine Technology

Health Correspondent Allison Aubrey updates us on the Biden Administration's goal to have 70 percent of U.S. adults vaccinated by the July 4. Plus, as vaccine makers plan for the possibility that COVID-19 vaccine boosters will be needed, they're pushing ahead with research into new-generation flu shots and mRNA cancer vaccines.

COVID-19 Vaccines, Boosters And The Renaissance In Vaccine Technology

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Tom Hanks arrives to attend the 11th Annual Governors Awards gala hosted by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences at the Dolby Theater in Hollywood on October 27, 2019. Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

BONUS: Tom Hanks, Fox News, And A Debate About Whiteness In Hollywood

This all started with a guest essay by Tom Hanks for The New York Times called "You Should Learn the Truth About the Tulsa Race Massacre," in which Hanks made the case for a more widespread teaching of American history involving Black Americans, especially of events like the Tulsa Race Massacre. He wrote: "History was mostly written by white people about white people like me, while the history of Black people — including the horrors of Tulsa — was too often left out. Until relatively recently, the entertainment industry, which helps shape what is history and what is forgotten, did the same. That includes projects of mine."

BONUS: Tom Hanks, Fox News, And A Debate About Whiteness In Hollywood

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The Statue of Liberty and the New York skyline are seen as fireworks go off in New York Harbor in celebration of reaching 70% of New York adults having received their first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine on Tuesday. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Will The U.S. Meet Its July 4 Vaccination Goal? Your State May Already Have

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A general view of the U.S. Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan in 2013. The embassy is facing a coronavirus outbreak, according to the State Department. Ahmad Nazar/AP hide caption

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Ahmad Nazar/AP

A teen gets a dose of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine last month at Holtz Children's Hospital in Miami. Nearly 7 million U.S. teens and preteens (ages 12 through 17) have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine so far, the CDC says. Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images

In this March 18, 2021 file photo, Dr. Anthony Fauci testifies during a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Dr. Fauci Says The Risks From The Delta Variant Underscore The Importance Of Vaccines

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Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell testifies at a House Financial Services Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in December. The Fed said on Wednesday it will continue providing support to the economy despite the rise in consumer prices. Jim Lo Scalzo/Pool via AP hide caption

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Jim Lo Scalzo/Pool via AP

Federal Reserve Will Continue Supporting The Economy Despite Surging Prices

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A sticker reads, "I got vaccinated," at a vaccination site inside Penn Station last month in New York City. Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

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Noam Galai/Getty Images

Royal Caribbean had been set to launch the Odyssey of the Seas on its first cruise with passengers in early July. But positive coronavirus tests among the crew have forced the voyage to be delayed for four weeks. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Memorials hang from the front gate of Greenwood Cemetery in New York City during an event organized by Naming the Lost Memorials to remember and celebrate those who died during the COVID-19 pandemic. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The Twitter account @FacesofCOVID, says creator Alex Goldstein, helps people mourn. And as long as COVID-19 persists, he plans on running the account. Michele Abercrombie/NPR hide caption

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Michele Abercrombie/NPR

This Twitter Account Is Honoring COVID Victims, With 5,000 Obituaries And Counting

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Customers shop for produce at a supermarket on Thursday in Chicago. Inflation rose 5% in the 12-month period ending in May, the biggest jump since August 2008. Food prices rose 2.2% for the same period. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Why Everything Is More Expensive Right Now

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The infectious and contagious rabies virus, shown here in a colorized micrograph, can be transmitted to humans through the bite or saliva of an infected animal. Thanks to protective vaccination of pets, rabies was eliminated from the U.S. dog population in 2007, though a bite from infected bats, skunks and raccoons can still transmit the virus. Biophoto Associates/Science Source hide caption

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Biophoto Associates/Science Source

The U.S. Bans Importing Dogs From 113 Countries After Rise In False Rabies Records

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Novavax says its vaccine is 100% effective against the original strain of the coronavirus and had 93% efficacy against more worrisome variants. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

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Alastair Grant/AP

Novavax Says Its COVID Vaccine Is Extremely Effective

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Janelia's cafeteria, which was noisy and crowded in pre-pandemic times, now operates a contactless takeout system. Sarah Silbiger for NPR hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger for NPR

It's Personal: Zoom'd Out Workplace Ready For Face-To-Face Conversations To Return

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Solid research has found the vaccines authorized for use against COVID-19 to be safe and effective. But some anti-vaccine activists are mischaracterizing government data to imply the jabs are dangerous. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

Anti-Vaccine Activists Use A Federal Database To Spread Fear About COVID Vaccines

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Pilgrims walk around the Kaaba at the Grand Mosque in the Muslim holy city of Mecca on July 31, 2020. Saudi Arabia says this year's hajj pilgrimage will be limited to no more than 60,000 people, all of them from within the kingdom. Ministry of Media/AP hide caption

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Ministry of Media/AP