Series: Join The Game Press "A" to join NPR's new column on games and gaming culture — from the latest console titles to what's on our tabletops.
Special Series

Join The Game

NPR's new column on games and gaming culture

(Clockwise) It Takes Two, Resident Evil 8: Village, Life is Strange: True Colors, Valheim and Inscryption NPR hide caption

toggle caption
NPR

The top five video games of 2021 selected by the NPR staff

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1064945778/1068201382" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An anonymous bidder won a pristine copy of a 1996 Nintendo Mario 64 for $1.56 million, according to Heritage Auctions. Heritage Auctions hide caption

toggle caption
Heritage Auctions

Mamma Mia! Super Mario 64 Is The First Video Game To Sell For More Than $1 Million

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1016037499/1016300711" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Farming Simulator is a realistic farming experience — minus bugs, droughts and disasters. Giants Software hide caption

toggle caption
Giants Software

This Farming Video Game Is So Popular, People Pay To Watch Gamers Play It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1008986894/1008986895" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In "Never Yield," you play as Wally, a mysterious kid who's stolen an important package Aerial_Knight hide caption

toggle caption
Aerial_Knight

Hear 'Land of the Rising Moon,' from 'Never Yield'

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/998659427/998695079" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Today, we're talking about our three favorite video games, which are available to play on the Nintendo Switch and beyond. Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Angela Hsieh/NPR

In the Pokémon Snap games, you're not capturing mons and forcing them to fight — you're taking pictures of them in their natural habitats. Screenshot by Kaity Kline/Nintendo hide caption

toggle caption
Screenshot by Kaity Kline/Nintendo