The National Conversation With All Things Considered The National Conversation with All Things Considered takes your questions about the coronavirus pandemic and poses them to experts who have the answers.
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The National Conversation With All Things Considered

People eat outside of a restaurant in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on May 18. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Answering Your Coronavirus Questions: Global Health, Small Businesses, Silver Linings

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People walk past "COVID-19" drawn in the sand amid the coronavirus pandemic in Brooklyn on Sunday. The death toll from the coronavirus in the United States is nearing 100,000 as states begin to lift some of their restrictions, including beach access. Bryan R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images

Answering Your Coronavirus Questions: Death Toll, Immigration And Acts Of Kindness

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A woman walks into a COVID-19 testing site on May 12 in Arlington, Va. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

People are seen practicing social distancing in white circles last weekend in Brooklyn's Domino Park. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

People wearing masks walk past a mural of encouragement displayed outside a store amid the coronavirus pandemic on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Answering Your Coronavirus Questions: Health Insurance, Jobs And What Kids Are Asking

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Moderna, a U.S. drug manufacturer, reported promising early results from the first clinical tests of an experimental vaccine against the coronavirus performed on a small number of volunteers. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Answering Your Coronavirus Questions: Vaccines, Recovery And How To Relax

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Professional sports came to a standstill in March when an NBA player tested positive for COVID-19. Most leagues around the world have stopped games altogether. The question many of them face now isn't when games will come back but how. Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images

Answering Your Coronavirus Questions: Professional Sports And Furloughed Workers

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Few people are seen at Times Square on Friday. Retail sales plummeted 16.4% in April, a record drop, as millions of Americans stayed home. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Gilead Science's remdesivir is one of the most highly anticipated drugs being tested against the new coronavirus. The drug showed positive results in a large-scale U.S. government trial, the company said on April 29. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

On Wednesday, an employee cleans the entrance of a restaurant in the Crystal City neighborhood of Arlington, Va., as restaurants and businesses try to adapt to the ever-changing situation amid the coronavirus pandemic. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

A child attempts to fly a kite in the backyard in Arlington, Va. on April 9, with nearby parks closed due to the coronavirus outbreak and orders to stay at home. As summer begins, many are wondering what they can do if they can't travel because of the pandemic. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Answering Your Coronavirus Questions: Nursing Homes, Death Toll And Summer Travel

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Beachgoers enjoy a day at Galveston Beach on May 2 in Galveston, Texas, amid the coronavirus pandemic. As states have started to reopen, people have begun gathering again. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

Answering Your Coronavirus Questions: Young COVID-19 Patients And Visiting Others

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Health care workers place a nasal swab from a patient into a tube for testing at a free pop-up coronavirus testing site in Brooklyn. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. workforce has transformed in a matter of weeks, with millions of Americans now working from home full time and many places closed. On this broadcast of The National Conversation, we answer your questions about navigating the changing workplace. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

It's been about two months since people across the country started spending the vast majority of their time — and their meals — at home. That comes with the new challenge of cooking most meals at home. On this broadcast of The National Conversation, chef Samin Nosrat answers your questions about cooking at home. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

Answering Your Coronavirus Questions: Virus Data, Pandemic Cooking And Mental Health

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Many businesses — including this nail salon in Arlington, Va. — remain closed during shelter-in-place lockdowns across the country. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Answering Your Coronavirus Questions: Blood, The Environment And A Family's Loss

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A cyclist in a face mask rides past the Million Dollar Theater in downtown Los Angeles on Monday. Gov. Gavin Newsom announced that California — amid encouraging coronavirus benchmarks — will allow some retail businesses to reopen with modifications as early as Friday. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Answering Your Coronavirus Questions: The Economy, Vaccines And COVID-19 Survivors

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On Friday, employees at many online retailers, grocery store chains and package-delivery services protested what they describe as unsafe working conditions amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images

More places are requiring people wear masks, including grocery stores and airlines. On this broadcast of The National Conversation, an epidemiologist answers your questions about the face coverings. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

In the four months since the first coronavirus case was reported, more information has been discovered about the virus itself. We answer your questions about the most recent virus facts. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

People sit at a distance from each other as they wait to be tested at a COVID-19 mobile testing station in a public school parking area in Compton, Calif. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Answering Your Coronavirus Questions: New Symptoms, Economy And Virtual Celebrations

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