Faces Of The Coronavirus Recession Jobs lost. Businesses in peril. Meetings gone virtual. Faces Of The Coronavirus Recession offers snapshots of working Americans whose lives have been upended by the pandemic.
Special Series

Faces Of The Coronavirus Recession

Snapshots of lives upended by a pandemic. Jobs lost, virtual meetings, future uncertain.

Parkview Early Learning Center in Spokane, Wash., has been operating at one-third capacity under pandemic guidelines. Co-owner Luc Jasmin III says it has been tough to turn away parents, many of whom are essential workers. Kathryn Garras hide caption

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Kathryn Garras

Avery Hoppa with her 3-year-old daughter Zelda. Hoppa says she's "incredibly grateful" that she and her husband still have jobs. But she says it "feels weird to be a consumer right now" as many are struggling financially. Avery Hoppa hide caption

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Avery Hoppa

Keri Belcher, who has worked in the oil and gas industry, says she's considering switching careers — even if it means less time outdoors, which is what attracted her to geology in the first place. Peter Flaig hide caption

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Peter Flaig

Bartolomé Perez of Los Angeles has cooked at McDonald's for 30 years. He helped stage a walkout at his restaurant in April after a coworker tested positive for COVID-19. Courtesy of the Fight for $15 and a Union hide caption

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Courtesy of the Fight for $15 and a Union

Cynthia Murray's hours at Walmart had already been cut, and she was worried about her health in the pandemic. After a customer shouted at her, she decided to go on unpaid leave. Chuck Kennedy/MCT/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Chuck Kennedy/MCT/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Theodore Johnson worked full time as a massage therapist at a luxury hotel in Texas. When the coronavirus crisis hit, he tried to get unemployment, but the system was overloaded. That sent him to an Amazon warehouse, where he now works. Heather King hide caption

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Heather King

Josep Navas Masip, seen with his dog Ruquet, purchased a second home in Philadelphia and was renovating it for use as an Airbnb when the coronavirus crisis hit. Now his plans are canceled and he's unsure what to do for income. Josep Navas Masip hide caption

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Josep Navas Masip

Michelle Lee, who has worked for Safeway for 32 years, wishes customers would be more patient about shortages. "They can't understand why they keep coming back and we don't have" items such as toilet paper, she says. Robert Lee hide caption

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Robert Lee

Carolyn Mendel, a General Mills plant manager in Wellston, Ohio, says she has compared notes on workplace safety with a rival frozen food maker nearby. Courtesy of General Mills hide caption

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Courtesy of General Mills

The dental practice where Candace Grenier has worked for two decades shut down in mid-March. That's just before her son, Ryeder, lost his job at an auto body shop. Seth Franklin hide caption

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Seth Franklin

Jose de los Rios works at a Procter & Gamble plant in Mehoopany, Pa., that makes Charmin toilet paper and other products. The factory has been running nonstop in recent weeks. Procter & Gamble hide caption

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Procter & Gamble

Tracy Delphia has been told she will be called back to work as soon as business conditions improve — whenever that is. Her biggest concern is her ability to pay the mortgage. Tracy Delphia hide caption

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Tracy Delphia

Allie Clancy, an aspiring TV producer, had to cut short her dream internship at Boston's TD Garden arena. "I'm trying to get used to the idea that I might not get a job in my field for a little while." Jonas Spencer hide caption

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Jonas Spencer

Rocio Tirado, who works for a New Orleans area newspaper, has seen her pay drop during the pandemic. She asked her sons Nicholas (left) and Emilio to be less wasteful. Rocio Tirado hide caption

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Rocio Tirado

Scott Severs and his wife, Julie Bartlett, have been able to pay their mortgage and they have a healthy emergency fund. He donated his federal rescue check but acknowledges not everyone can. Courtesy of Scott Severs hide caption

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Courtesy of Scott Severs

Neftali Dubon, a truck driver at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, says he needs at least five or six runs a day to make a living. By mid-March he was doing one or two. As an owner-operator, he still has to keep paying down a loan on his rig. Courtesy of Neftali and Cynthia Dubon hide caption

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Courtesy of Neftali and Cynthia Dubon