Coronavirus By The Numbers Data to make sense of the pandemic and the response
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Coronavirus By The Numbers

A person wearing a face covering walks past a white flag memorial installation outside Griffith Observatory honoring the nearly 27,000 Los Angeles County residents who have died from COVID-19 on Nov. 18 in Los Angeles, Calif. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

A woman receives a Pfizer vaccination booster shot from a nurse in Los Angeles. California Department of Public Health officials say that no fully vaccinated adult should be denied a COVID-19 booster shot in the state. Gary Coronado/Los Angeles Times via Getty Imag hide caption

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Gary Coronado/Los Angeles Times via Getty Imag

The number of people that one sick person will infect (on average) is called R0. Here are the maximum R0 values for a few viruses. NPR hide caption

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NPR

The Delta Variant Isn't As Contagious As Chickenpox. But It's Still Highly Contagious

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Duy Nguyen/NPR

Where Are The Newest COVID Hot Spots? Mostly Places With Low Vaccination Rates

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A coronavirus variant that is thought to be more contagious was detected in the United States in Elbert County, Colo., not far from this testing site in Parker, Colo. The variant has been detected in several U.S. states. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images
Sean McMinn/NPR

COVID-19 Hospitalizations Hit Record Highs. Where Are Hospitals Reaching Capacity?

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Ruth Talbot/NPR

COVID-19 Contact Tracing Workforce Barely 'Inching Up' As Cases Surge

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A new wave of rapid coronavirus tests has entered the market with the potential to greatly expand screening for the virus. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Can The U.S. Use Its Growing Supply Of Rapid Tests To Stop The Virus?

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Ruth Talbot/NPR

14 States Make Contact Tracing Data Public. Here's What They're Learning

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Ruth Talbot/NPR

Coronavirus Cases Are Surging. The Contact Tracing Workforce Is Not

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NPR

As Coronavirus Surges, How Much Testing Does Your State Need To Subdue The Virus?

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Ruth Talbot/NPR

As States Reopen, Do They Have The Workforce They Need To Stop Coronavirus Outbreaks?

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