Morning Edition Song Project Morning Edition asks musicians to write original songs that capture what life is like in the era of COVID-19.
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Morning Edition Song Project

Vijay Iyer. Ebru Yildiz/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Ebru Yildiz/Courtesy of the artist

Floating Along In Uncertainty With Vijay Iyer

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Tasha Cobbs Leonard, photographed in 2020. JD Barnes/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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JD Barnes/Courtesy of the artist

Gospel Sensation Tasha Cobbs Leonard Has Several Reasons (For You) To Believe

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Matt Allen, who records under the name Nur-D. Marrie Weigel /Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Marrie Weigel /Courtesy of the artist

For Twin Cities Rapper Nur-D, Another Step Forward

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Money Mark, a still from the documentary The Sound of Toys. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Money Mark, Beastie Boys Keyboardist, Has A Timeless Reminder

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Ishibashi was born to post-war immigrants from Japan, which, albeit slowly, the artist has conceptually embraced more in his music. Rachael Renee Levasseur/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Rachael Renee Levasseur/Courtesy of the artist

On 'For Every Voice That Never Sang,' Kishi Bashi Is Confident For A Changing World

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From left: Angel, Israel, Momo, Abraham and Victory Boyd. The pandemic afforded the Boyd family a chance to harmonize interpersonally, before doing the same as Infinity Song. Courtesy of Shore Fire Media hide caption

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Courtesy of Shore Fire Media

Get Out Of Your Head With Infinity Song's 'Outside Myself'

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Jazz fusion band Snarky Puppy, led by League, recently won the Best Contemporary Instrumental Album at the 63rd annual Grammy Awards. Stella K/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Stella K/Courtesy of the artist

On 'The Last Friend,' Michael League Imagines Death As A Benevolent Companion

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The New York musician's entry for Morning Edition's Song Project draws its heartache from personal experience. Charlotte Pinson/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Charlotte Pinson/Courtesy of the artist

Kat Edmonson Hopes This Song Project Entry, 'If You're Scared,' Will Comfort Her Mom

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The Fort Lauderdale duo Black Violin wrote "Time to Shine" after reflecting on what happened last year and ringing in the new one. Mark Clennon/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Mark Clennon/Courtesy of the artist

On 'Time To Shine,' Black Violin Focuses On The Light

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In "Broken Harvest," Madison Cunningham writes as an artist who has lost major opportunities to the pandemic, but found inspiration in her time off. Claire Marie Vogel/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Claire Marie Vogel/Courtesy of the artist

On 'Broken Harvest,' Madison Cunningham Is Hopeful For A Fresh Start

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Lila Downs' song for the Morning Edition Song Project, "Dark Eyes," honors essential workers who are often overlooked. Jennifer Pochat/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Jennifer Pochat/Courtesy of the artist

Lila Downs' New Song Is About Indigenous Workers' Invisible Labor

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Brandy Clark's new track for the Morning Edition Song Project is about processing death and celebrating a life well lived. Chris Phelps hide caption

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Chris Phelps

On 'Remember Me Beautiful,' Brandy Clark Processes Death And Celebrates Life

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Adam Weiner's new track for Morning Edition's Song Project is for people who feel isolated around the holidays, especially this year. Gab Bonghi/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Gab Bonghi/Courtesy of the artist

Adam Weiner's New Song, 'Christmas Makes Me Cry,' Channels Holiday Loneliness

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PJ Morton's new track for Morning Edition's Song Project, "Still Here," is about working through a year full of challenges and loss. Matt Robertson/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Matt Robertson/Courtesy of the artist

On 'Still Here,' PJ Morton Reflects On Surviving 2020

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Sarah Jarosz's new track for Morning Edition's Song Project, "Up in the Clouds," is about coming to terms with life at a standstill. Josh Wool/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Josh Wool/Courtesy of the artist

On 'Up In The Clouds,' Sarah Jarosz Adjusts To Staying Still

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Thao Nguyen's new track for Morning Edition's Song Project is about the day wildfire haze blotted out the sun over San Francisco, illuminating everything wrong with 2020. Shane McCauley hide caption

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Shane McCauley

On 'All This And More,' Thao Nguyen Tackles Post-Apocalyptic Omens

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Rhiannon Giddens' new track for Morning Edition's Song Project series describes her feelings of emotional whiplash during the COVID-19 era. Ebru Yildiz/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Ebru Yildiz/Courtesy of the artist

Rhiannon Giddens Confronts Emotional Whiplash On 'Best Day / Worst Day'

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Lori McKenna's new track for Morning Edition's Song Project series was inspired by her children's perspectives of the COVID-19 era. Becky Fluke/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Becky Fluke/Courtesy of the artist

On 'This Close,' Lori McKenna Draws Inspiration From Family

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From left: Norman Spence, Tarriona "Tank" Ball, Albert Allenback and Joshua Johnson are the New Orleans band Tank and the Bangas. Their new track for Morning Edition's Song Project was inspired by a collective feeling of restlessness in the COVID-19 era. Jamelle Tate/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Jamelle Tate/Courtesy of the artist

Tank And The Bangas Have 'Feelings' On The COVID-19 Era

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Amy Ray (left) and Emily Saliers are the veteran folk-rock duo Indigo Girls. Their new track for Morning Edition's Song Project was inspired by the collective feeling of restlessness in the COVID-19 era. Jeremy Cowart/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Jeremy Cowart/Courtesy of the artist

Indigo Girls' New Song Is About Patience And Fortitude In The COVID-19 Era

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Colin Meloy says that the idea for his new song came while watching a documentary on Slint's 1991 album Spiderland. Shervin Lainez/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Shervin Lainez/Courtesy of the artist

On His New Song, Colin Meloy Gets Lost In 'Slint, Spiderland'

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"I think it's OK to have different views as long as you can come together and talk to each other with love," Devon Gilfillian says. "Me and my friend agreed to come together and have that conversation." Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Devon Gilfillian Thinks The Pandemic Has Exposed The 'Cracks In The Ceiling'

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