Climate Risk Hits Home Each year, about 35 million Americans relocate, often to places in danger of flood or wildfire, without ever knowing the perils. This series explains the risks and the questions to ask about them.
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Climate Risk Hits Home

The remnants of Hurricane Sandy churn up Lake Michigan in Chicago in 2012. Flood risk in the city is increasing as climate change drives more extreme rain, and renters face greater financial peril than homeowners. More than half of Chicagoans are renters, according to 2019 census data. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Most Tenants Get No Information About Flooding. It Can Cost Them Dearly

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A California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection airplane drops fire retardant along a burning hill during the Glass Fire in Calistoga, Calif., in September. California is one of two states to require wildfire risk be disclosed to new homebuyers. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Millions Of Homes Are At Risk Of Wildfires, But It's Rarely Disclosed

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Lachlan (left) and Lillian Barilleau play in the backyard of their home in Central, La. They were displaced from the house for months after a flood in 2016. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Living In Harm's Way: Why Most Flood Risk Is Not Disclosed

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Floods are the most deadly and expensive natural disaster in the U.S. And yet, in most parts of the country, it's easy to move into a flood-prone building and not even know you're in harm's way. Kaz Fantone/NPR hide caption

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Kaz Fantone/NPR

Destructive wildfires are on the rise in the United States. More than 40 million Americans live in zones at high risk because towns and cities have increasingly expanded into fire-prone landscapes. Kaz Fantone/NPR hide caption

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Kaz Fantone/NPR

Is Your Home At Risk Of Wildfire In A Changing Climate? 6 Questions To Ask

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A truck sits in still water after Hurricane Laura swept through Cameron Parish, La. The hurricane inflicted at least $8 billion in damage to southwest Louisiana when it hit in late August. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR