Coronavirus Guide The Science Of Living Safely In The Pandemic
Special Series

Coronavirus Guide

The Science Of Living Safely In The Pandemic

Left to right: a neck gaiter (aka a buff) that slips over the head; a KN95 respirator, a version of the N95 respirator used in U.S. hospitals; a pleated surgical mask (below the KN95); a cloth mask. Photo illustration by Max Posner/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Photo illustration by Max Posner/NPR

Spending quality time with kids and listening deeply to them is one way to help them tame anxiety. Here Mariano Noesi and Maryam Jernigan-Noesi play with their 4-year-old son Carter. Jernigan-Noesi is a child psychologist. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

Going to stay with family means exposing more than one household. Can testing in advance keep everyone safe? Noel Hendrickson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Noel Hendrickson/Getty Images

A drop-off at a day care last month in the Queens borough of New York City. Lindsey Nicholson/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Lindsey Nicholson/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Meredith Miotke for NPR

From Camping To Dining Out: Here's How Experts Rate The Risks Of 14 Summer Activities

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/861325631/861819346" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

More than 64 million Americans live in multigenerational households. Despite the emotional and financial benefits of living together, families like the Walkers, at home in Florissant, Mo., face a particular set of challenges as COVID-19 continues to spread. Michael B. Thomas for KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Michael B. Thomas for KHN

Dental offices have begun seeing patients return for routine procedures. Seattle dentist Kathleen Saturay has increased the layers of protective equipment she wears when treating patients. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Elaine Thompson/AP

Health researchers say wearing masks and washing your hands often is more important than wiping down surfaces when it comes to protecting yourself from the coronavirus. Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images

Still Disinfecting Surfaces? It Might Not Be Worth It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/948936133/950724250" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A paramedic uses a pulse oximeter to check a patient's vital signs during an August home visit in the Bronx borough of New York. Angus Mordant/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Angus Mordant/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Health care workers will be among the first to receive a COVID-19 vaccine when they become available. But the vaccines have not been tested on pregnant women, raising questions about whether pregnant and lactating health care workers should get the shots. Justin Tallis/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Tallis/Pool/Getty Images
LA Johnson/NPR

How To Retain Your Heat (And Stay Upbeat) With Friends Outside This Winter

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/944634690/948759601" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Sarah Gonzales for NPR

A College Student Is Coming Home. Should The Whole Family Wear Masks?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/933968091/935756081" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">