Untangling Disinformation NPR series examines how widespread the problem of disinformation is, and efforts to overcome it.
Special Series

Untangling Disinformation

Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., questions Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson during the judge's confirmation hearing on March 22. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Iryna Holoshchapova, a Ukrainian refugee who fled the embattled city of Mykolaiv, shows a video on her smartphone of an apartment block on fire following a Russian attack. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Mesa County Clerk Tina Peters is seen in a Feb. 10 booking photo. Peters is under investigation for alleged election security breaches. Mesa County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Mesa County Sheriff's Office via AP

Colorado clerk is indicted for election tampering and misconduct

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Ben Bergquam was hospitalized with COVID in January. He says he brought his own prescription for ivermectin — an unproven COVID therapy. Screenshot by NPR/Facebook hide caption

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Screenshot by NPR/Facebook

What a bottle of ivermectin reveals about the shadowy world of COVID telemedicine

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Joe Rogan, the comedian, TV commentator and podcaster, reacts during an Ultimate Fighting Championship event in May 2020. Douglas P. DeFelice/Getty Images hide caption

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Douglas P. DeFelice/Getty Images

What the Joe Rogan podcast controversy says about the online misinformation ecosystem

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In October, Eric Trump, son of the former president, spoke to a conference filled with anti-vaccine activists. Screenshot by NPR/Bitchute hide caption

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Screenshot by NPR/Bitchute

Inside the growing alliance between anti-vaccine activists and pro-Trump Republicans

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Daniel Wood/NPR

Pro-Trump counties now have far higher COVID death rates. Misinformation is to blame

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Dr. Lee Merritt is a orthopedic and spinal surgeon who spreads misinformation about COVID-19. She is affiliated with a prominent right-wing group known as America's Frontline Doctors. R. Kellman/Screenshot from Rumble hide caption

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R. Kellman/Screenshot from Rumble

A doctor spread COVID misinformation and renewed her license with a mouse click

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Washington Secretary of State Kim Wyman on Tuesday was named to a top post overseeing election security within the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

A protester unleashes a smoke grenade in front of the U.S. Capitol building on Jan. 6. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How the 'Stop the Steal' movement outwitted Facebook ahead of the Jan. 6 insurrection

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A major gathering of anti-vaccine activists will take place this weekend at the Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center in Nashville, Tenn. While the hotel, seen here, encourages guests to wear masks, they are not mandatory. Andrew Woodley/Education Images/Universal Image hide caption

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Andrew Woodley/Education Images/Universal Image

While COVID still rages, anti-vaccine activists will gather for a big conference

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People opposed to COVID-19 vaccines often embrace ivermectin, a drug they think is not getting the attention it deserves. Here, an anti-vaccination protester takes part in a rally against vaccine mandates last month in Santa Monica, Calif. Ringo Chiu/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ringo Chiu/AFP via Getty Images

How ivermectin became the new focus of the anti-vaccine movement

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Dr. Simone Gold discourages vaccination against COVID-19 and promotes alternative, unproven therapies. She has spent much of the past year speaking at events like this one held in West Palm Beach, Fla., in December. The conference was aimed at young people ages 15 to 25. Gage Skidmore hide caption

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Gage Skidmore

This Doctor Spread False Information About COVID. She Still Kept Her Medical License

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Supporters of Mesa County clerk Tina Peters appear at a rally for her last month in Grand Junction, Colo. Peters is under investigation over the unauthorized release of sensitive information about voting equipment. Stina Sieg/CPR News hide caption

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Stina Sieg/CPR News

Voting Data From A Colorado County Was Leaked Online. Now The Clerk Is In Hiding

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Jen Easterly, director of the Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, speaks with Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose, left, during the summer meeting of the National Association of Secretaries of State. Christina Almeida Cassidy/AP hide caption

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Christina Almeida Cassidy/AP

Death Threats And Conspiracy Theories: Why 2020 Won't End For Election Officials

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Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold speaks at a press conference about investigation into the Mesa County election breach, on Thursday in Denver. RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/Denver Post via Getty Images

Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) is co-sponsoring a bill that seeks to hold social media platforms responsible for the proliferation of health misinformation during a public health emergency. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

The COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective, but misinformation keeps many people from taking the shot. Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images