Untangling Disinformation NPR series examines how widespread the problem of disinformation is, and efforts to overcome it.
Special Series

Untangling Disinformation

Mark Zuckerberg, chief executive officer of Facebook Inc., speaks virtually during a House Energy and Commerce Subcommittees hearing. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

5 Takeaways From Big Tech's Misinformation Hearing

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A worker prepares to give a COVID-19 vaccine last week at the Dignity Health Sports Park in Carson, Calif. Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group/Long Beach Press-Telegram via Getty Images hide caption

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Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group/Long Beach Press-Telegram via Getty Images

Few Facts, Millions Of Clicks: Fearmongering Vaccine Stories Go Viral Online

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Google's Sundar Pichai, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg and Twitter's Jack Dorsey face Congressional scrutiny over the spread of misinformation on their platforms. Michael Reynolds-Pool/Getty Images/Composite by NPR hide caption

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Michael Reynolds-Pool/Getty Images/Composite by NPR

SkySilk CEO Kevin Matossian joined the tech company just before it decided to help revive the conservative social media site Parler. Tara Pixley for NPR hide caption

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Tara Pixley for NPR

Why SkySilk Came Out of Nowhere To Save Parler After Capitol Riot

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Trump supporters clash with police outside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Social media companies are under scrutiny for allowing their platforms to be used to spread falsehoods about the 2020 election and to allow violent extremist groups to organize January's insurrection. Brent Stirton/Getty Images hide caption

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Brent Stirton/Getty Images

Trump Is No Longer Tweeting, But Online Disinformation Isn't Going Away

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Matt Williams for NPR

'Exit Counselors' Strain To Pull Americans Out Of A Web Of False Conspiracies

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False conspiracy theories have always been a part of U.S. history, but experts say they're spreading faster and wider than ever before. Matt Williams for NPR hide caption

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Matt Williams for NPR

'More Dangerous And More Widespread': Conspiracy Theories Spread Faster Than Ever

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The disinformation and "big lie" of election fraud motivated many people to storm the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Matt Williams for NPR hide caption

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Matt Williams for NPR

Disinformation Fuels Distrust And Even Violence At All Levels Of Government

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