Untangling Disinformation NPR series examines how widespread the problem of disinformation is, and efforts to overcome it.
Special Series

Untangling Disinformation

Journalist Masha Borzunova during a taping of the show Fake News in TV Rain's Moscow studios. Lucian Kim/NPR hide caption

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Lucian Kim/NPR

Russian Show 'Fake News' Wages Lone Battle Against The Kremlin's TV Propaganda

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The majority of anti-vaccine claims on social media trace back to a small number of influential figures, according to researchers. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Just 12 People Are Behind Most Vaccine Hoaxes On Social Media, Research Shows

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A man walks by a mobile health clinic displaying a picture of Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega (right) and his wife and vice president, Rosario Murillo, in Managua on April 14, 2020. The government claims to be successfully combating the pandemic but health workers and critics say the toll is likely higher. Inti Ocon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Inti Ocon/AFP via Getty Images

Anti-vaccine advocates are using the COVID-19 pandemic to promote books, supplementals and services. Emilija Manevska/Getty Images hide caption

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Emilija Manevska/Getty Images

For Some Anti-Vaccine Advocates, Misinformation Is Part Of A Business

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A worker passes a Dominion Voting Systems ballot scanner during Georgia's runoff Senate elections in January in Gwinnett County outside Atlanta. Former President Donald Trump and his allies spread falsehoods about the company's role in the 2020 election, leading to a slew of defamation lawsuits. Ben Gray/AP hide caption

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Ben Gray/AP

People receive the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine at the Al-Abbas Islamic Center, converted into a vaccination clinic in Birmingham, England, in January. Sheikh Nuru Mohammed, the imam at the mosque, recognized many of his congregants were hesitant to get the "jab," as it's called, due to false rumors and distrust of government. So he began to fight disinformation during his sermons. Darren Staples/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Darren Staples/AFP via Getty Images

How A U.K. Imam Countered Vaccine Hesitancy And Helped Thousands Get The 'Jab'

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Religious Leaders Had To Fight Disinformation To Get Their Communities Vaccinated

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How India Is Confronting Disinformation On Social Media Ahead Of Elections

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An Ultra-Orthodox Jewish man receives a dose of the Pfizer-BioNtech vaccine in the Israeli city of Bnei Brak in February. Mostafa Alkharouf/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Mostafa Alkharouf/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

How Israel Persuaded Reluctant Ultra-Orthodox Jews To Get Vaccinated Against COVID-19

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How Israel Successfully Combated COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy

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Researcher Studies How Messaging On COVID-19 Disparities Affects Policy Preferences

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An NPR investigation into the SolarWinds attack reveals a hack unlike any other, launched by a sophisticated adversary intent on exploiting the soft underbelly of our digital lives. Zoë van Dijk for NPR hide caption

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Zoë van Dijk for NPR

A 'Worst Nightmare' Cyberattack: The Untold Story Of The SolarWinds Hack

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Johnson & Johnson was mentioned roughly the same amount every hour online Tuesday as it was in entire weeks before news of the vaccine's pause, according to the tracking firm Zignal Labs. Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The Most Popular J&J Vaccine Story On Facebook? A Conspiracy Theorist Posted It

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Exploring YouTube And The Spread Of Disinformation

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