We Hold These Truths At a moment when American society feels particularly divided, and the political system particularly fragile, we propose an examination of American democracy and how people participate in it.
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We Hold These Truths

The Racist Architecture Of Homeownership: How Housing Segregation Has Persisted

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NPR Project: How Can Americans Make Democracy Work For Them?

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How To Be A Citizen: Being Involved In Civic Life At A Young Age

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How To Be A Citizen: Education

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Robert E. Lee High School in Jacksonville, Fla., is one of many schools in Duval County named after Confederate figures. Bob Self for NPR hide caption

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Bob Self for NPR

Confederate Names On Schools Are Flashpoints. Here's One Community's Story

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Student journalists at the University of Georgia's newspaper, The Red & Black, saw firsthand how covering their local community was more important than ever over the last year. Taylor Gerlach/Courtesy The Red & Black hide caption

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Taylor Gerlach/Courtesy The Red & Black

The Next Generation Of Journalists Are Ready To Change The News Industry

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The Jan. 6 Capitol riot was just one story among many over this past year in which news language evolved to more accurately describe the event. Brent Stirton/Getty Images hide caption

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Brent Stirton/Getty Images

How Newsroom Leaders Wrestled With Covering A Tumultuous Year

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NPR White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, center, is one of the many journalists who had to figure out how to combat disinformation while covering former President Trump. Ayesha Rascoe/NPR hide caption

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Ayesha Rascoe/NPR

There's More News Than Ever, But That Doesn't Mean The Truth Is Breaking Through

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Ex-Students At Robert E. Lee High In Florida Disagree Over Name Changes

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How To Be A Citizen: What It Takes To Run For Office With Joe Neguse

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How To Be A Citizen: Transportation Worker Goes Above And Beyond

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How To Be A Citizen: From MFA To DSA To N.Y. Legislature

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City Council candidate Stanley Martin stands in front of an informal memorial to Daniel Prude in Rochester, N.Y. Prude was a man with mental health and drug issues who died last year after being taken into police custody. Mustafa Hussain for NPR hide caption

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Mustafa Hussain for NPR

Rochester, N.Y., Wants To Reimagine Police. What Do People Imagine That Means?

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Robert Lee Johnson in his old neighborhood in Compton. Johnson remembers moving in one day in 1961. "I see moving vans, trucks and everything all down the street," he says. Johnson was 5 years old at the time, so he says he thought "it was moving day for everybody." And he noticed that all the other families moving in were were Black, too. Nevil Jackson for NPR hide caption

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Nevil Jackson for NPR

Black Americans And The Racist Architecture Of Homeownership

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