The Undercount: The invisible death toll from climate change Climate change is deadly. Why do so many climate-related deaths go uncounted?
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The Undercount: The invisible death toll from climate change

Pima County Medical Examiner Greg Hess at his office in Tucson, Ariz. Hess and another Arizona-based medical examiner are rethinking how to catalog and count heat-related deaths, a major step toward understanding the growing impacts of heat. Cassidy Araiza for NPR hide caption

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Cassidy Araiza for NPR

Climate Mortality - Coroners & Medical Examiners

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Catastrophic flash floods killed dozens of people in eastern Kentucky in July 2022. Here, homes in Jackson, Ky., are flooded with water. Arden S. Barnes/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Arden S. Barnes/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Climate change is deadly. Exactly how deadly? Depends who's counting

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