Mountain Stage Live recordings from the award-winning public radio program, hosted by Larry Groce.
Special Series

Mountain Stage

West Virginia Public Broadcasting presents live concerts: folk, country and the blues

The Pines performing live on Mountain Stage. Josh Saul/Mountain Stage hide caption

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The Pines On Mountain Stage

Led by Benson Ramsey and David Huckfelt, the band plays washy, dark, melodic sounds that evoke the stark side of folk-rock. Hear The Pines play songs from Dark So Gold live on stage in Minnesota.

The Pines On Mountain Stage

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Julia Sweeney and Jill Sobule perform live on Mountain Stage. Josh Saul/Mountain Stage hide caption

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The Jill & Julia Show On Mountain Stage

Bits from Julia Sweeney's award-winning monologues are stitched together with Jill Sobule's poignant songwriting, and it all makes sense. The duo performs a side-splitting set live from Minnesota.

The Jill & Julia Show On Mountain Stage

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BoDeans recently performed live on Mountain Stage. Josh Saul/Mountain Stage hide caption

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BoDeans On Mountain Stage

Formed in 1983, the rock band performs songs from its 11th studio album, American Made — and includes an upbeat cover of the sultry Bruce Springsteen classic "I'm On Fire."

BoDeans On Mountain Stage

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The Slide Brothers performing live on Mountain Stage. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

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The Slide Brothers On Mountain Stage

The vocal style of steel guitar playing reached peak popularity with the Brothers' protégé, Robert Randolph, who produced the group's most recent album. Hear their blend of gospel and blues rock.

The Slide Brothers On Mountain Stage

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The Howlin' Brothers performing live on Mountain Stage. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

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The Howlin' Brothers On Mountain Stage

The Brothers bring the roots and branches of traditional music into a sound that is uniquely their own. This set includes "Delta Queen," which was not heard during the radio broadcast.

The Howlin' Brothers On Mountain Stage

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Ben Sollee performing live on Mountain Stage. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

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Ben Sollee On Mountain Stage

Earnest and forthcoming onstage, Sollee shares his anxieties about being a young father through his song "Slow Down," and dedicates the song "DIY" to anyone who devotes time to the creative process.

Ben Sollee On Mountain Stage

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Thao & The Get Down Stay Down performing live on Mountain Stage. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

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Thao & The Get Down Stay Down On Mountain Stage

Thao Nguyen has recorded three albums with her band, including the latest, We the Common. The group's set includes the title track, which is dedicated to an inmate Nguyen bonded with as a volunteer.

Thao & The Get Down Stay Down On Mountain Stage

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The Bottle Rockets performing live on Mountain Stage. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

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Bottle Rockets On Mountain Stage

Now 20 years in, the roots rock band was recognized as one of the most clever and poignant acts in the early '90s revival of the genre. Hear the group perform the popular "Radar Gun."

Bottle Rockets On Mountain Stage

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Ramblin' Jack Elliott performing live on Mountain Stage in 1989. Mountain Stage hide caption

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Ramblin' Jack Elliott On Mountain Stage

A folk-singing zealot, Elliott has seemingly met, charmed and influenced nearly every popular music icon of our time. Hear the man President Clinton called "an American treasure" live in concert.

Ramblin' Jack Elliott On Mountain Stage

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From left to right: John Hartford, Tony Rice, Jamie Hartford and Ramblin' Jack Elliott at Mountain Stage in 1989. Mountain Stage hide caption

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Tony Rice On Mountain Stage

Among bluegrass musicians, Tony Rice is regarded as the most influential guitarist in the genre's history. During this Mountain Stage performance from 1989, Rice performs songs from Manzanita.

Tony Rice On Mountain Stage

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Anna McGarrigle performs on Mountain Stage in 1989. Mountain Stage hide caption

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The McGarrigle Sisters On Mountain Stage

When Anna McGarrigle sang with her late sister Kate, their voices were almost magically beautiful. This set from 1989 features Kate's son, a 16-year-old Rufus Wainwright, who sings lead for one song.

The McGarrigle Sisters On Mountain Stage

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John Hartford performs live on Mountain Stage. Mountain Stage hide caption

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John Hartford On Mountain Stage

Hartford's musical influence can be found threaded through the works of contemporary artists like Béla Fleck and The Avett Brothers. For this performance from 1989, the musician is joined by his son.

John Hartford On Mountain Stage

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Bill Monroe performing live on Mountain Stage in 1989. Mountain Stage hide caption

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Bill Monroe On Mountain Stage

Monroe was the father of bluegrass music; the style itself was created by and named for his band The Blue Grass Boys in the late '40s. The influential musician made a 1989 visit to Mountain Stage.

Bill Monroe On Mountain Stage

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Mark Bates performs live on Mountain Stage. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

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Mark Bates On Mountain Stage

Bates plays a solo concert in West Virginia, accompanied only by his own acoustic guitar. The singer-songwriter's set includes "Lucinda," a heartfelt tribute to one of his greatest influences.

Mark Bates On Mountain Stage

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Brendan James performs live on Mountain Stage. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

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Brendan James On Mountain Stage

The singer wraps his tranquil voice around his own energetic piano playing. James' new album Simplify, from which this Mountain Stage performance is drawn, may be his most emotionally direct work yet.

Brendan James On Mountain Stage

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