Mountain Stage Live recordings from the award-winning public radio program, hosted by Larry Groce.
Special Series

Mountain Stage

West Virginia Public Broadcasting presents live concerts: folk, country and the blues

The Guthrie Family. Brian Blauser hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser

The Guthrie Family On Mountain Stage

As Mountain Stage looks back on relatives who've appeared over the last 26 years, the Guthrie family comes to mind. In February 2007, Arlo Guthrie brought the Guthrie Family Legacy tour to Mountain Stage, featuring son Abe, daughter Sarah Lee and son-in-law Johnny Irion. Hear the first family of American folk music perform some of patriarch Woody Guthrie's well-known songs, as well as some music of their own.

Listen Now: The Guthrie Family In Concert

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/127350122/127275292" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Paul Thorn performed on Mountain Stage. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Paul Thorn On Mountain Stage

Thorn writes about his southern upbringing on his autobiographical ninth album, Pimps and Preachers. He sings about lessons learned from his mentors, including his Pentecostal minister father and his uncle, who pursued more licentious means of employment.

Listen Now: Paul Thorn In Concert

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/127092419/127061545" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

King Wilkie. Brian Blauser hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser

King Wilkie On Mountain Stage

King Wilkie began as a bluegrass band, but has a reputation for defying tradition and expectations. After several transformations in style and personnel, the group has steered its sound into a surprisingly Beatles-esque pop realm.

King Wilkie On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/106968421/106801344" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver. Brian Blauser hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser

Doyle Lawson, Quicksilver On Mountain Stage

Originally from Sullivan County, Tenn., Lawson possesses a love of a cappella gospel singing that was instilled in him by his musical parents. In this Mountain Stage performance, Lawson sings songs from his newest CD (Lonely Street) with the help of his band, Quicksilver.

Doyle Lawson And Quicksilver On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/106918414/106801804" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Lovell Sisters. Brian Blauser hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser

The Lovell Sisters On Mountain Stage

The Lovell Sisters demonstrate their love of many musical styles on their album Time to Grow. The Georgia bluegrass trio performed its final concert together in January, but in this archival performance, it makes its mark on Mountain Stage.

The Lovell Sisters On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/106881326/106801970" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Sara Watkins. Brian Blauser hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser

Sara Watkins On Mountain Stage

Watkins is a master of the fiddle, as well as the ukulele, the guitar and the human voice. She performs a generous set in this Mountain Stage appearance, accompanied by her brother, Sean Watkins.

Sara Watkins On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/106846777/106802308" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Steve Earle. Brian Blauser hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser

Steve Earle On Mountain Stage

In this Mountain Stage performance, Earle combines his own storytelling with songs from his latest album. Townes is composed of songs written by Earle's friend and mentor, the late singer-songwriter Townes Van Zandt.

Steve Earle On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/106818466/106802573" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Meaghan Smith. Brian Blauser hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser

Meaghan Smith On Mountain Stage

With the influence of musically gifted parents and sisters, Smith showed a great love and knowledge of music from an early age. She started off pursuing a career in animation, but her love of performance eventually led her to the stage and the recording studio.

Listen Now: Meaghan Smith In Concert

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/106728822/106727894" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Yarn. Brian Blauser hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser

Yarn On Mountain Stage

The roots group Yarn was nurtured in Brooklyn. Through miles and seasons of touring, the band developed a harmony-rich Americana sound that often elicits obvious comparisons to The Band.

Yarn On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/106684421/106448142" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Ruthie Foster. Brian Blauser hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser

Ruthie Foster On Mountain Stage

At 14, Foster was a soloist in her uncle's choir. From then on, her life revolved around music. Her latest is the critically acclaimed The Truth According to Ruthie Foster, in which she demonstrates her tremendous range of musical influences.

Ruthie Foster On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/106636783/106447740" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Rocco DeLuca. Brian Blauser hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser

Rocco DeLuca On Mountain Stage

DeLuca was introduced to soul music by his father, who was a touring guitarist for the legendary Bo Diddley. DeLuca's elastic, brazen vocals soar in a way that brings to mind the late, revered singer Jeff Buckley.

Rocco Deluca On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/106594827/106447221" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Martin Sexton. Brian Blauser hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser

Martin Sexton On Mountain Stage

Sexton taught himself to play guitar and learned to capture the attention of his audience by busking on the streets of Harvard Square in Boston. He showcases his soulful voice and percussive guitar playing in this captivating solo performance.

Martin Sexton On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/106551395/106446904" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Vic Chesnutt. Brian Blauser hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser

Vic Chesnutt On Mountain Stage

Paralyzed at age 18, Chesnutt began playing his intricate, emotional songs around Athens, Ga. In his seventh appearance on Mountain Stage, Chesnutt reveals an unrecorded song, "Granny," inspired by a dream.

Vic Chesnutt On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/106050824/105723603" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Sonos. Brian Blauser hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser

Sonos On Mountain Stage

The six members of Sonos perform vocal arrangements of contemporary pop songs with beat-box backing. Their Mountain Stage set includes "I Want You Back," a Motown hit in 1969 for the Jackson 5.

Listen Now: Sonos In Concert

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/106060026/105723576" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Crooked Fingers. Brian Blauser hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser

Crooked Fingers On Mountain Stage

Songwriter and guitarist Eric Bachmann started out in college radio and has been crafting his sound ever since. Now, with Crooked Fingers, he performs songs from the band's fifth CD, Forfeit/Fortune.

Crooked Fingers On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/105922573/105723480" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">