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Dead trees in the forests of the Harz Region. Esme Nicholson/NPR hide caption

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Esme Nicholson/NPR

Climate change threatens Germany's fairy tale forests

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Fire burns in the hollow of an old-growth redwood tree in Big Basin Redwoods State Park in California. The Biden administration has identified more than 175,000 square miles of old growth and mature forests on U.S. government lands. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Diakine Sambou, queen of the sacred forest of Kaoupoto, on Feb. 23, 2021, in Mlomp, Senegal. Ricci Shryock hide caption

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Ricci Shryock

Meet the people safeguarding the sacred forests and lagoons of West Africa

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This 1990 aerial file photo shows a section of the Tongass National Forest in Alaska that has patches of bare land where clear-cutting has occurred. The federal government plans to reinstate restrictions on road-building and logging on the country's largest national forest. Hall Anderson/Ketchikan Daily News via AP, File hide caption

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Hall Anderson/Ketchikan Daily News via AP, File

Yevgeniy Medvedovskiy, the chief of the Zhytomyr region's department of ecological inspection, walks around the site of the jet crash picking up shards of metal and looking at the fallen trees. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Russia's War In Ukraine Is Hurting Nature

The war in Ukraine is devastating that nation's rich, natural environment - from chemical leaks poisoning water supplies and warships killing dolphins to explosions disrupting bird migrations. NPR Environmental Correspondent Nate Rott has been reporting from Ukraine. He sits down with Short Wave's Scientist in Residence Regina G. Barber to talk about how the Russian invasion is harming the environment even beyond Ukraine's borders.

Russia's War In Ukraine Is Hurting Nature

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Viktor Radushinskiy, a member of Ukraine's forestry department in Zhytomyr, looks at a site in the northern Ukrainian woods where a fighter jet crashed. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Shredded trees, dead dolphins and wildfires — how Russia's invasion is hurting nature

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Crazy worms — an invasive species from Asia — pose a threat to forests, scientists say. The worms can thrash around so violently that they can jump out of a person's hand. They also lose their tail — on purpose. Josef Görres/Plant and Soil Science Department University of Vermont hide caption

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Josef Görres/Plant and Soil Science Department University of Vermont