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science of happiness

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Can little actions bring big joy? Researchers find 'micro-acts' can boost well-being

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A team of researchers recently reviewed studies on five of the most widely discussed happiness strategies—gratitude, being social, exercise, mindfulness/meditation and being in nature—to see if the findings held up to current scientific best practices. filo/Getty Images hide caption

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The science of happiness sounds great. But is the research solid?

How do we really get happier? In a new review in the journal Nature Human Behavior, researchers Elizabeth Dunn and Dunigan Folk found that many common strategies for increasing our happiness may not be supported by strong evidence. In today's Short Wave episode, Dunn tells co-host Aaron Scott about changes in the way scientists are conducting research, and how these changes led her team to re-examine previous work in the field of psychology.

The science of happiness sounds great. But is the research solid?

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Rachel Maryam Smith fell in love with the ethereal beauty of giant soap bubbles several years ago and began creating them at sunset events in Santa Cruz, Calif. When enjoying bubbles together, "there is a euphoric point I have observed my participants reach," she says. Carolyn Klein Lagattuta hide caption

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Carolyn Klein Lagattuta
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Stuck In A Rut? Sometimes Joy Takes A Little Practice

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