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Former President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in September 2022. At the rally, Trump invited the president and founder of the nonprofit Patriot Freedom Project to give a speech. The group's close ties to Trump have prompted scrutiny from lawmakers. Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

Rep. Elaine Luria, D-Va., greets Wandrea "Shaye" Moss, a former Georgia election worker, after she testified at the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection on Tuesday as committee members Reps. Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill., and Jamie Raskin, D-Md., wait their turn. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

John Eastman, left, listens as former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani speaks at the Jan. 6, 2021, "Save America" rally that preceded the attack on the U.S. Capitol. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

This sketch depicts Guy Wesley Reffitt (left) and his lawyer, William Welch, in federal court in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 28. A jury found Reffitt guilty on all counts for his participation in the Jan. 6, 2021, riot at the U.S. Capitol. Dana Verkouteren/AP hide caption

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Dana Verkouteren/AP

In the first Jan. 6 trial, a jury found Capitol riot defendant Guy Reffitt guilty

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Prior to his arrest on charges stemming from the riot at the U.S. Capitol, Alan Hostetter led protests against lockdown policies related to COVID-19 and pro-Trump "Stop The Steal" rallies in California. In a recent video posted to the platform BitChute, he said he will represent himself at trial, while wearing a hat saying "COVID IS A SCAM." Screenshot via BitChute hide caption

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Screenshot via BitChute

Why some alleged Capitol rioters are acting as their own attorneys

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Alan Hostetter, seen here in May 2020, became a leading activist against coronavirus-related lockdown policies in Orange County, Calif. Hostetter, a former police chief and yoga instructor, is now facing conspiracy charges for his alleged role in the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. Mark Rightmire/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Rightmire/MediaNews Group via Getty Images

What Led A Police Chief Turned Yoga Instructor To The Capitol Riot?

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