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The Food and Drug Administration has fully approved Leqembi, the first drug shown to slow down Alzheimer's disease. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Alzheimer's drug Leqembi gets full FDA approval. Medicare coverage will likely follow

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This illustration made available by the National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health depicts cells in an Alzheimer's-affected brain. An experimental drug modestly slowed the brain disease's progression, researchers reported Tuesday. NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING, NIH/AP hide caption

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NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING, NIH/AP

Amyloid plaques are characteristic features of Alzheimer's disease. The new drug Aduhelm is able to remove this sticky substance that builds up in the brains of patients with the disease, but many doctors are still skeptical of how well it really works. Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Libra via Getty Images hide caption

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Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Libra via Getty Images

Cost and controversy are limiting use of new Alzheimer's drug

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Scan Of The Brain Of A Patient Affected By Alzheimer's Disease Axial Section. The Food and Drug Administration approved aducanamab, the first drug to affect the underlying disease processes associated with Alzheimer's in June. BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty

Why Aduhelm, a new Alzheimer's treatment, isn't reaching many patients

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Among the topics discussed at the 2021 Alzheimer's Association International Conference were how doctors should think about prescribing the new drug Aduhelm and how COVID may affect the brain long-term. The Alzheimer's Association hide caption

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The Alzheimer's Association

As part of a clinical study, a patient with Alzheimer's disease receives an infusion of aducanumab at a Providence, R.I., hospital in 2019. Aducanumab is being marketed as Aduhelm. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

A New Alzheimer's Drug Comes With Lots Of Questions About How To Use It

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