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Experts say the new COVID boosters are a much closer match to currently circulating variants than prior vaccines and boosters. Frederick J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederick J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

The new COVID boosters are coming: Here's what you need to know

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A COVID booster is administered in Jakarta, Indonesia. Eko Siswono Toyudho/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Eko Siswono Toyudho/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

As immunity wanes fom the first booster, the FDA has now authorized a second shot for people 50 and older and some immunocompromised people. The CDC has also recommended that people get the booster. FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images

CDC recommends 2nd COVID boosters for some older and immunocompromised people

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A third shot of the Moderna vaccine boosts protection across age groups, notably in older adults, the company says. Juana Miyer/Long Visual Press/Universal Imag hide caption

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Juana Miyer/Long Visual Press/Universal Imag

Testing your antibody levels to get a sense of your COVID-19 protection may be tempting, especially as you wait for a booster shot. But scientists say these widely available tests can't tell you the full story, at least not yet. Naveen Sharma/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty hide caption

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Naveen Sharma/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty

Antibody Tests Should Not Be Your Go-To For Checking COVID Immunity

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People line up last week to receive COVID-19 vaccines in Kampala, Uganda, after weeks of no supply. In Uganda, only 2.2% of the population had received one dose of a vaccine as of Aug. 15. Hajarah Nalwadda/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Hajarah Nalwadda/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images

Why A Push For Boosters Could Make The Pandemic Even Worse

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The director of WHO now says that a booster moratorium should be in force until 10% of the population in all countries is vaccinated. Israel had previously announced plans to give a third Pfizer dose to residents age 60 and up after an uptick in COVID cases. Above: Administering a booster on August 2 in Tel Aviv. Kobi Wolf/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Kobi Wolf/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Why WHO Is Calling For A Moratorium On COVID Vaccine Boosters

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