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Costumers gather for food and drinks at Time Out Market in Lisbon, Portugal. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Portugal has one of the top vaccination rates but isn't taking chances with omicron

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Hattie Pierce, 75, receives a Pfizer covid-19 vaccine booster shot from Dr. Tiffany Taliaferro at the Safeway on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Monday, October 4, 2021. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag

A health care worker prepares a dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine during a clinic held at the Watts Juneteenth Street Fair in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Nurse Christina Garibay administers Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine to a man at a community outreach event in Los Angeles in August. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Janet Gerber, a health department worker in Louisville, Ky., processes boxes containing vials of the Johnson & Johnson COVID vaccine in March. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

The U.S. is preparing for COVID-19 vaccine booster shots, though exactly who needs one is not entirely clear. Emily Elconin/Getty Images hide caption

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Emily Elconin/Getty Images

Dr. Janet Woodcock, acting commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, appears before a Senate committee in July. Many public health leaders say letting the agency go so long without a permanent director has demoralized staff and sends the wrong message about the agency's importance. Stefani Reynolds/Pool/The New York Times via AP hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Pool/The New York Times via AP

A syringe with the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine is prepared at a mobile vaccine clinic in Santa Ana, Calif., in August. An international group of scientists is arguing the average person doesn't need a COVID-19 booster yet — an opinion that highlights the intense scientific divide over the question. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Health care providers who administer a COVID-19 vaccine "off-label" face legal liability, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns. Luis Alvarez/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Alvarez/Getty Images

People line up last week to receive COVID-19 vaccines in Kampala, Uganda, after weeks of no supply. In Uganda, only 2.2% of the population had received one dose of a vaccine as of Aug. 15. Hajarah Nalwadda/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Hajarah Nalwadda/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images

Why A Push For Boosters Could Make The Pandemic Even Worse

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