home insurance home insurance
Stories About

home insurance

AFP Contributor/AFP via Getty Images

Why is insurance so expensive right now? And more listener questions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197963851/1244871755" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In this aerial view, the destruction left in the wake of Hurricane Ian is shown on Oct. 2, 2022, in Fort Myers Beach, Fla. The state's home insurance market is reeling after disasters like this one. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Feeling the pinch of high home insurance rates? It's not getting better anytime soon

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1208590263/1208869455" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
David McNew/Getty Images

Rich Snyder, who retired as the fire marshal of Sierra Madre, Calif., now works for Allied Disaster Defense, a California company that hardens homes against wildfire. One strategy is covering air vents with ember-blocking mesh. Liz Baker/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Liz Baker/NPR

Preparing homes for wildfires is big business that's only getting started

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198325664/1199077855" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A row of mailboxes tagged with evacuation notices during the Oak Fire in Mariposa, Calif., in July 2022. Many residents in the area are losing their home insurance because of rising wildfire risk. David Odisho/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Odisho/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How climate change could cause a home insurance meltdown

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1186540332/1189831568" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Damage from Hurricane Ian near Pine Island, Fla., in 2022. The storm caused at least $50 billion in insured damage. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gerald Herbert/AP

Insurance firms need more climate change information. Scientists say they can help

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1176852678/1177626450" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript