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vaccine mandates

President Biden promotes his administration's vaccine or testing requirements for workers at the Clayco construction site in Elk Grove Village, Ill., on Oct. 7. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

Protesters gather at the Iowa Capitol in Des Moines on Thursday to push the legislature to pass a bill that would prohibit vaccine mandates from being imposed on employees in Iowa. David Pitt/AP hide caption

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David Pitt/AP

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis speaks at a news conference on Sept. 16 in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. The state of Florida is suing the Biden administration over its coronavirus vaccine mandate for federal contractors. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

At a meeting in Concord, New Hampshire, on Oct. 13, 2021, audience members voice opposition to federal vaccine mandates. Some employers, from state governments to hospitals to private companies, have already begun enforcing their own vaccine mandates, leading to the resignation or firing of a small percentage of workers. Holly Ramer/AP hide caption

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Holly Ramer/AP

Thousands of workers are opting to get fired, rather than take the vaccine

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Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (seen here on Sept. 22) has issued an executive order banning private companies from enforcing COVID vaccine mandates. Joel Marinez/The Monitor via AP hide caption

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Joel Marinez/The Monitor via AP

A person receives the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at a clinic at St. Patrick's Catholic Church in Los Angeles in April. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Judging 'sincerely held' religious belief is tricky for employers mandating vaccines

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The waiting area of a pop-up vaccination site at St. John The Divine Cathedral sits empty as the rush for vaccinations winds down on June 27, 2021 in New York City. The demand for vaccinations has declined just as the Delta Plus variant of the coronavirus begins to take hold in the United States. David Dee Delgado/Getty Images hide caption

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David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Getting a religious exemption to a vaccine mandate may not be easy. Here's why

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A droplet falls from a syringe after a health care worker was injected with the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine last year at a hospital in Providence, R.I. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP