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Researchers used computer simulations of black holes and machine learning to generate a revised version (right) of the famous first image of a black hole that was released back in 2019 (left). Medeiros et al 2023 hide caption

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Medeiros et al 2023

The Hubble Space Telescope has spotted the farthest star ever seen. The magnified galaxy looks like a stretched out red line with three dots. The single star is the middle one. NASA, ESA, Brian Welch (JHU), Dan Coe (STScI) hide caption

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NASA, ESA, Brian Welch (JHU), Dan Coe (STScI)

The light from this star that astronomers just spotted is 12.9 billion years old

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Because space shuttle missions went up to repair and refurbish the Hubble Space Telescope, it has a relatively large carbon footprint compared to other telescopes. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Astronomy's contribution to climate change rivals the emissions from some countries

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The James Webb Space Telescope's primary mirror is made up of 18 hexagonal segments. Now that the telescope is in space, mission managers need to perfectly align them so the segments work as one giant mirror. NASA/Chris Gunn hide caption

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NASA/Chris Gunn

This is an artist's rendering of the James Webb Space Telescope. The kite-shaped sunshield is the largest component of the telescope. NASA GSFC/CIL/Adriana Manrique Gutierrez hide caption

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NASA GSFC/CIL/Adriana Manrique Gutierrez

Why the most powerful space telescope ever needs to be kept really, really cold

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Technicians work on NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, which will launch in December. Astronomers say the next big telescope should be designed to search signs of life on planets that orbit distant stars. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

NASA's new telescope bears the name of James Webb (center), an influential figure who was appointed by President John F. Kennedy to lead the space agency during the '60s. But some astronomers say discrimination against gay and lesbian government employees during his tenure should preclude him from having a telescope named in his honor. PhotoQuest/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoQuest/Getty Images

Shadowed by controversy, NASA won't rename its new space telescope

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The James Webb space telescope is an infrared telescope that will observe the early universe, between one million and a few billion years in age. NASA hide caption

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NASA

After Years Of Delays, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope To Launch In December

In December, NASA is scheduled to launch the huge $10 billion James Webb Space Telescope, which is sometimes billed as the successor to the aging Hubble Space Telescope. NPR correspondents Rhitu Chatterjee and Nell Greenfieldboyce talk about this powerful new instrument and why building it took two decades.

After Years Of Delays, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope To Launch In December

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An artist's conception of the James Webb Space Telescope after it has unfolded in space. NASA GSFC/CIL/Adriana Manrique Gutierrez hide caption

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NASA GSFC/CIL/Adriana Manrique Gutierrez

NASA's Got A New, Big Telescope. It Could Find Hints Of Life On Far-Flung Planets

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Two views of the Eagle Nebula's "Pillars of Creation," both taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. The left shows the pillars in visible light; the right image was taken in infrared light. NASA, ESA/Hubble and the Hubble Heritage Team hide caption

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NASA, ESA/Hubble and the Hubble Heritage Team

NASA Is Launching A New Telescope That Could Offer Some Cosmic Eye Candy

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