EVs EVs
Stories About

EVs

With his son in one arm, Tesla CEO Elon Musk waves while visiting the Tesla Gigafactory in Germany in March. Ebrahim Noroozi/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ebrahim Noroozi/AP

Morning traffic fills the SR2 freeway in Los Angeles, California. The EPA released new rules for vehicle emissions that are expected to cut tailpipe pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, which are fueling climate change. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David McNew/Getty Images

In a boost for EVs, EPA finalizes strict new limits on tailpipe emissions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1239092833/1239767599" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

You asked, we answered: Your questions about electric vehicles

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1196978858/1238364020" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man polishes an Atto 3 car from Chinese car maker BYD at the International Motor Show (IAA) in Munich, Germany, on Sept. 4, 2023. The car has gained in popularity among Europeans. Christof Stache/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Christof Stache/AFP via Getty Images

Chinese electric carmakers are taking on Europeans on their own turf — and succeeding

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1225653773/1232085768" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A $7,500 tax credit for electric vehicles has seen substantial changes in 2024. It should be easier to get because it's now available as an instant rebate at dealerships, but fewer models qualify. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The $7,500 tax credit for electric cars keeps changing. Here's how to get it now

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1219158071/1221840081" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Stephan Bisaha/Gulf States Newsroom

Mark Warwick and Paige Posey host a morning show called 'The Breakfast Club' on their AM/FM station in Hendersonville, N.C. Julia Ritchey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Julia Ritchey/NPR

Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm is working hard to convince more Americans to embrace electric cars — and she knows this means the country's charging infrastructure needs to improve, fast. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Electric cars have a road trip problem, even for the secretary of energy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1187224861/1198508066" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Ford CEO Jim Farley speaks at the launch of the Ford F-150 Lightning at the Ford Rouge Electric Vehicle Center in Dearborn, Mich., on April 26, 2022. Farley is determined to expand production of electric cars — and at the same time, to make more energy-efficient gas-powered and hybrid models. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

Ford is losing a lot of money in electric cars — but CEO Jim Farley is charging ahead

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1193083777/1217949474" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Tesla vehicles recharge in February in Corte Madera, Calif. The government wants to accelerate the transition to electric vehicle, but how fast the country can actually move is being hotly debated. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Lelac Almagor and two of her children take NPR's Adam Bearne for a ride in their e-cargo bike. Eric Bourland hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Bourland

EVs are expensive. These city commuters ditched cars altogether — for e-bikes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1147192225/1148624639" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Jennifer Homendy speaks during a news conference on Oct. 3, 2019, in Windsor Locks, Conn. On Wednesday, Homendy, the chairwoman of the National Transportation Safety Board, said she is concerned about the risk that heavy electric vehicles pose if they collide with lighter vehicles. Chris Ehrmann/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Ehrmann/AP

Jaylin Jones, 28, an assembly floor technician, while working on the assembly line at the Ford Rouge Electric Vehicle Center in Dearborn, Mich., on September 7th, 2022. Brittany Greeson for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Brittany Greeson for NPR

Auto companies are racing to meet an electric future, and transforming the workforce

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1126079120/1126334332" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Electric vehicles are displayed at a news conference with White House Climate Adviser Gina McCarthy and Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg in Washington, D.C., on April 22, 2021. The Biden administration's climate and health care bill passed by Congress last week revamps a tax credit for buyers of electric cars. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

You can get a $7,500 tax credit to buy an electric car, but it's really complicated

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1118052620/1118676540" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Tesla CEO Elon Musk speaks during the official opening of the new Tesla electric car manufacturing plant near Gruenheide, Germany, on March 22. Musk reportedly wants to lay off 10% of staff because of his worries about the economy. Christian Marquardt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Christian Marquardt/Getty Images

The Lucid Air takes the stage at the 2021 LA Autoshow on November 17, 2021. The luxury electric sedan won the 2022 Motortrend Car of the Year award this month. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Every auto startup wants to be the next Tesla. Why these 2 may have a real shot

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1057282985/1058624416" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Motorists fill up their vehicles at a Shell station on July 22 in Denver. Phasing out the sale of gas-powered cars once seemed laughable. It's now inching closer to reality. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Zalubowski/AP

Giving up gas-powered cars was a fringe idea. It's now on its way to reality

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1055718914/1057347910" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">