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Jan. 6 House committee members, from left, Democratic Reps. Pete Aguilar, Zoe Lofgren, Adam Schiff and Chairman Bennie Thompson, are on the ballot in November, as are Reps. Jamie Raskin and Elaine Luria. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

A video showing Alex Jones is shown as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol holds a hearing on July 12. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Then-President Donald Trump is seen on the screen above the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection on Thursday in outtakes from his Jan. 7, 2021, video in which he refused to say he had lost the election. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Supporters cheer as President Donald Trump addresses them during a rally on Jan. 6, 2021. A NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll found that a majority of respondents blame Trump for the attack on the Capitol that followed the rally, but that a slightly larger majority don't think he'll face charges. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

A majority thinks Trump is to blame for Jan. 6 but won't face charges, poll finds

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Late on the afternoon of Jan. 6, 2021, then-President Donald Trump affectionately addressed insurrectionists at the U.S. Capitol from the White House. The House select committee investigating the siege says the then president failed to act for hours — instead "gleefully" watching TV. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon arrives at the U.S. District Court House as his trial for contempt of Congress continues on Wednesday. Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Then-Republican Conference Chair Rep. Liz Cheney, flanked by House Minority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy, right, and Republican Whip Rep. Steve Scalise, criticizes Democrats' impeachment of then-President Donald Trump in December 2019. Now she is trying to convince the public that Trump is to blame for the Jan. 6 insurrection. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

With the midterms in their sights, defending Trump isn't a Republican priority

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Rudy Giuliani's videotaped testimony appears on a video screen above members of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol during its seventh hearing on July 12, 2022. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Chairman Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., listens as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol holds a hearing at the Capitol on Tuesday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

A video of Pat Cipollone, former White House counsel, is shown on a screen during the seventh hearing held by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on Tuesday. Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images

From left, Washington Metropolitan Police Department officer Daniel Hodges, Capitol Police Sgt. Aquilino Gonell, and former Washington Metropolitan Police officer Michael Fanone, who all defended the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, listen during the seventh public hearing investigating the attack. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Marine Corps Lt. Col. Oliver North, accompanied by his lawyer Brendan Sullivan, was a central figure in the Iran-Contra hearings. Chris Wilkins/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Wilkins/AFP via Getty Images

An illlustration of a meeting at the Oval Office of the White House appears onscreen during a hearing by the House select committee to investigate the Jan. 6 Capitol attack in Washington on Thursday. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

A video displays a discussion about presidential pardons on Thursday during the fifth hearing by the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Richard Donoghue, former acting deputy attorney general, testifies Thursday before the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger and Georgia elections official Gabriel Sterling testify during a hearing held by the select committee to investigate the Jan. 6 Capitol attack on Tuesday in Washington. Michael Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Reynolds/Getty Images

Rep. Adam Schiff delivers remarks during a hearing by the House select committee to investigate the Jan. 6 Capitol attack on Tuesday in Washington. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

An image of former President Trump is displayed during the third hearing of the House Jan. 6 committee Thursday. Drew Angerer/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Former Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt spoke to NPR minutes after testifying Monday to the House Select Committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. "Television ... really damaged the capacity of Americans to be good citizens in a republic because they confused the TV show with the real thing," Stirewalt told NPR. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Fired Fox News politics editor: Trump's ire at election night call led to 'panic'

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