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abortion access

Kirsten Engel, an Arizona Democrat running for U.S. House, speaks during a Women's March rally in Phoenix on Jan. 20. Caitlin O'Hara/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Caitlin O'Hara/Bloomberg via Getty Images

House Democratic candidates make abortion access top focus of '24 campaigns

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A patient prepares to take the first of two combination pills, mifepristone, for a medication abortion during a visit to a clinic in Kansas City, Kan., on Oct. 12, 2022. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

State abortion initiatives have proved to be major voter mobilizers since the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the constitutional right to an abortion in 2022. Roberto Machado Noa/Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Machado Noa/Getty Images

A next big ballot fight over abortion could come to Arizona

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Anti-abortion demonstrators gather outside Planned Parenthood's Water Street Health Center in Milwaukee on Monday, Sept. 2023. Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin began offering abortions at the clinic that day after not doing so for more than a year. Margaret Faust/ WPR hide caption

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Margaret Faust/ WPR

U.S. Sen. Michael Rounds (R-SD) speaks to members of the press as he arrives at a Senate Republican policy luncheon. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

GOP Sen. Mike Rounds says 'common sense' will yield bipartisan defense spending bill

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Demonstrators rally to mark the first anniversary of the US Supreme Court ruling in the Dobbs v Women's Health Organization case in Washington, DC on June 24, 2023. ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images

Abortion access could continue to change in year 2 after the overturn of Roe v. Wade

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Volunteer pilots fly patients to get abortions and gender-affirming medical care from states with bans to nearby states where the services are available. Rose Conlon/Kansas News Service hide caption

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Rose Conlon/Kansas News Service

Volunteer pilots fly patients seeking abortions to states where it's legal

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Abortion-rights protesters fill Indiana Statehouse corridors on Aug. 5 as lawmakers vote on a near-total abortion ban, in Indianapolis. An Indiana judge on Thursday blocked the state's abortion ban from being enforced, putting the law on hold as abortion clinic operators argue that the new law violates the state constitution. AP/Arleigh Rodgers, File hide caption

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AP/Arleigh Rodgers, File

A room in a Planned Parenthood of Illinois clinic in Waukegan, where abortion providers from Wisconsin are helping to provide access to more patients from their home state now that abortion is nearly banned there. Manuel Martinez/WBEZ hide caption

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Manuel Martinez/WBEZ

Abortion is legal in Illinois. In Wisconsin, it's nearly banned. So clinics teamed up

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Dr. Nicole Scott, the residency program director at Indiana's largest teaching hospital, is worried what the near-total ban on abortion in the state means for her hospital's ability to recruit and retain the best doctors. Farah Yousry/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Farah Yousry/Side Effects Public Media

Brittany Mostiller, former executive director of the Chicago Abortion Fund, said the fund's financial support prevented her from taking more drastic actions she'd considered when she found out she was pregnant. Armando L. Sanchez/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Armando L. Sanchez/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

The view of an exam room inside the Hope Clinic For Women in Granite City, Illinois. People seeking abortions in restrictive states must now look beyond their borders, which is why a nonprofit organization wants to establish a floating clinic in federal waters. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

A floating abortion clinic is in the planning stage, and people are already on board

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Supporters of abortion rights rally at the Minnesota State Capitol Building in downtown St. Paul following the U.S. Supreme Court ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade. Michael Siluk/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Siluk/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

A Planned Parenthood of Montana clinic in Helena is among those that recently changed its policies to restrict its distribution of abortion pills only to patients from states without abortion bans in effect. Matt Volz/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Matt Volz/Kaiser Health News

An employee adds codes to a schedule board at the Hope Medical Group for Women in Shreveport, Louisiana. FRANCOIS PICARD/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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FRANCOIS PICARD/AFP via Getty Images

The economic effects of being denied an abortion

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A medical assistant checks a patient's pregnancy test at the Women's Reproductive Clinic, which provides legal medication abortion services, in Santa Teresa, N.M., in a photo taken last month. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Whole Woman's Health of Minnesota, a clinic that opened to patients in February, is one of only eight that provide abortions in the state and is located just a few minutes from the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. Christina Saint Louis/KHN hide caption

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Christina Saint Louis/KHN
Tracy Lee for NPR

For doctors, abortion restrictions create an 'impossible choice' when providing care

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