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abortion access

Dr. Nicole Scott, the residency program director at Indiana's largest teaching hospital, is worried what the near-total ban on abortion in the state means for her hospital's ability to recruit and retain the best doctors. Farah Yousry/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Farah Yousry/Side Effects Public Media

Their mentor was attacked. Now young OB-GYNs may leave Indiana

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Brittany Mostiller, former executive director of the Chicago Abortion Fund, said the fund's financial support prevented her from taking more drastic actions she'd considered when she found out she was pregnant. Armando L. Sanchez/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Armando L. Sanchez/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

The view of an exam room inside the Hope Clinic For Women in Granite City, Illinois. People seeking abortions in restrictive states must now look beyond their borders, which is why a nonprofit organization wants to establish a floating clinic in federal waters. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

A floating abortion clinic is in the planning stage, and people are already on board

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Supporters of abortion rights rally at the Minnesota State Capitol Building in downtown St. Paul following the U.S. Supreme Court ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade. Michael Siluk/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Siluk/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

A Planned Parenthood of Montana clinic in Helena is among those that recently changed its policies to restrict its distribution of abortion pills only to patients from states without abortion bans in effect. Matt Volz/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Matt Volz/Kaiser Health News

An employee adds codes to a schedule board at the Hope Medical Group for Women in Shreveport, Louisiana. FRANCOIS PICARD/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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FRANCOIS PICARD/AFP via Getty Images

The economic effects of being denied an abortion

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A medical assistant checks a patient's pregnancy test at the Women's Reproductive Clinic, which provides legal medication abortion services, in Santa Teresa, N.M., in a photo taken last month. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Whole Woman's Health of Minnesota, a clinic that opened to patients in February, is one of only eight that provide abortions in the state and is located just a few minutes from the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. Christina Saint Louis/KHN hide caption

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Christina Saint Louis/KHN
Tracy Lee for NPR

For doctors, abortion restrictions create an 'impossible choice' when providing care

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In many states, the options for safe abortion access will become virtually non-existent if the Supreme Court overturns Roe V. Wade, the landmark Supreme Court decision that protected abortion rights since 1973. Catherine McQueen/Getty Images hide caption

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Catherine McQueen/Getty Images

What to consider about contraception and pregnancy after Roe v. Wade is overturned

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Shane Tolentino for NPR

ATLANTA, GA - MAY 21: People hold signs during a protest against recently passed abortion ban bills at the Georgia State Capitol building, on May 21, 2019 in Atlanta, Georgia. The Georgia "heartbeat" bill would ban abortion when a fetal heartbeat is detected. (Photo by Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images) Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

How Changes in Abortion Law Could Impact Community Health

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Abortion rights demonstrators gather near the Washington Monument during a nationwide rally in support of abortion rights in Washington, D.C., US, on May 14, 2022. Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Why Abortion Access Is Important For A Healthy Community

Abortion access has been leading political news in recent weeks. But what happens when we look at abortion as a health care tool that betters public health? Today, Emily talks to Liza Fuentes, a Senior Research Scientist at the Guttmacher Institute, a research organization that focuses on sexual and reproductive health. Fuentes says abortion access is an important part of health care for a community and losing access can exacerbate income and health inequalities.

Why Abortion Access Is Important For A Healthy Community

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Workers at a family planning health center get emotional as thousands of abortion rights advocates march past their clinic on their way into downtown Chicago on May 14, 2022. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Some clinics are bracing for a huge influx of patients if Roe v. Wade is overturned

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An abortion-rights protester holds up a sign during a demonstration in front of the Supreme Court on Saturday in Washington, D.C. Less than a week since the leaked draft of the Court's potential decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, protesters on both sides of the abortion debate continue to demonstrate in front of the building which has been fortified by a temporary fence. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Abortion providers and advocates experience déjà vu as Roe v. Wade is threatened

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Abortion-rights supporters protest in downtown Los Angeles on Tuesday. California is one of the states that is expanding abortion access to prepare for the possibility of the Supreme Court striking down Roe v. Wade. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Planned Parenthood volunteer Sarah Mahoney checks a list of addresses in Windham, Maine to see which door to knock on next. Patty Wight/Maine Public Radio hide caption

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Patty Wight/Maine Public Radio

A new way to talk about abortion? In Maine, using deep conversation to reach voters

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