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Jan. 6 attack

This artist sketch depicts the trial of Oath Keepers leader Stewart Rhodes and four others charged with seditious conspiracy in the Jan. 6, 2021, U.S. Capitol attack. Dana Verkouteren/AP hide caption

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Dana Verkouteren/AP

President Biden awards the Presidential Citizens Medal, the nation's second-highest civilian honor, to U.S. Capitol Police officer Caroline Edwards during a ceremony to mark the second anniversary of the Jan. 6 assault on the Capitol in the East Room of the White House on Friday. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Stewart Rhodes, founder of the Oath Keepers, center, speaks during a rally outside the White House in Washington on June 25, 2017. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Oath Keepers planned an armed rebellion, prosecutor tells jury in sedition case

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Keith Packer (shown here on Jan. 13, 2021) of Newport News, Va., stormed the U.S. Capitol while wearing an antisemitic "Camp Auschwitz" sweatshirt over a Nazi-themed shirt. He has been sentenced to 75 days of imprisonment. Western Tidewater Regional Jail via AP hide caption

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Western Tidewater Regional Jail via AP

A man holds a flag and listens to a speaker during a rally at South Carolina's Statehouse on Sunday, Jan. 17, 2021, in Columbia, S.C. Meg Kinnard/AP hide caption

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Meg Kinnard/AP

Supporters cheer as President Donald Trump addresses them during a rally on Jan. 6, 2021. A NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll found that a majority of respondents blame Trump for the attack on the Capitol that followed the rally, but that a slightly larger majority don't think he'll face charges. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

A majority thinks Trump is to blame for Jan. 6 but won't face charges, poll finds

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Late on the afternoon of Jan. 6, 2021, then-President Donald Trump affectionately addressed insurrectionists at the U.S. Capitol from the White House. The House select committee investigating the siege says the then president failed to act for hours — instead "gleefully" watching TV. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Then-Republican Conference Chair Rep. Liz Cheney, flanked by House Minority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy, right, and Republican Whip Rep. Steve Scalise, criticizes Democrats' impeachment of then-President Donald Trump in December 2019. Now she is trying to convince the public that Trump is to blame for the Jan. 6 insurrection. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

With the midterms in their sights, defending Trump isn't a Republican priority

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Rudy Giuliani's videotaped testimony appears on a video screen above members of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol during its seventh hearing on July 12, 2022. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

A U.S. Secret Service agent stands by as Marine One departs with President Biden aboard as he departs the White House in September 2021. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Secret Service erased texts from two-day period spanning Jan. 6 attack, watchdog says

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A video of Pat Cipollone, former White House counsel, is shown on a screen during the seventh hearing held by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on Tuesday. Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images

From left, Washington Metropolitan Police Department officer Daniel Hodges, Capitol Police Sgt. Aquilino Gonell, and former Washington Metropolitan Police officer Michael Fanone, who all defended the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, listen during the seventh public hearing investigating the attack. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Wandrea "Shaye" Moss, a former Georgia election worker, becomes emotional while testifying about how being singled out in false claims that the 2020 election was stolen from Donald Trump has ruined her life. Michael Reynolds/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Reynolds/Pool/Getty Images

White House Counsel Pat Cipollone, left, is seen with Keith Kellog, center, national security adviser to Vice President Mike Pence, watching Marine One carrying President Donald Trump leave the White House ahead of President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration on Jan. 20, 2021. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Cassidy Hutchinson, a former aide to Trump White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, testified during the sixth hearing by the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

An image of former President Donald Trump talking to his Chief of Staff Mark Meadows is displayed as Cassidy Hutchinson, a former top aide to Meadows, testifies about events around the Capitol insurrection to the House Jan. 6 select committee. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images