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A burned cot in a police station in Kherson on Wednesday. Kherson residents say Russians used the police station to detain and torture violators of curfew and people suspected of collaborating with Ukrainian authorities. Pete Kiehart for NPR hide caption

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Pete Kiehart for NPR

Screams from Russia's alleged torture basements still haunt Ukraine's Kherson

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Local people react to a volunteer from Odesa distributing aid on the main square in front of the Regional Administration Building in Kherson on Wednesday. Pete Kiehart for NPR hide caption

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Pete Kiehart for NPR

Hanna Malyar, Ukraine's deputy defense minister (center), signs a Ukrainian flag belonging to a local resident in Kherson on Monday. "Ukraine's success depends on two points," Malyar told NPR. "First our strength, our ability to fight. And second, the weapons that we receive from our partners," referring to the United States and other Western nations. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Ukrainians dance in Kherson's streets at the end of Russia's months-long occupation

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In this photo provided by the Ukrainian Presidential Press Office, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, surrounded by his guards, walks on central square during his visit to Kherson on Monday. Ukrainian Presidential Press Office/AP hide caption

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Ukrainian Presidential Press Office/AP

Col. Roman Kostenko liberated his home village in Kherson last week. Russian troops occupied his childhood home for months. They took his body armor and medals and left a grenade and a vulgar message on an outside wall. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

An elderly woman walks in the southern Ukrainian village of Arkhanhelske, outside Kherson, on Nov. 3. The Russians occupied the village until recently. Now Ukrainian forces are moving into villages where the Russians left. The Russians said they completed their withdrawal from Kherson on Friday, marking a major victory for Ukraine. Bulent Kilic/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bulent Kilic/AFP via Getty Images

Russia retreats from Kherson. Why is the U.S. nudging Ukraine on peace talks?

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Kirill Stremousov, deputy head of the Russian-backed Kherson administration, in his office in Kherson on July 20. A portrait of Russian President Vladimir Putin is on the wall behind him. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

The Ukrainian artillery battery of the 59th Mechanized Brigade fires a howitzer at points controlled by Russian troops in Kherson Oblast, Ukraine on Saturday. Metin Aktas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Metin Aktas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Russia says it's withdrawing from the key city of Kherson, but Ukraine is skeptical

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A resident looks out the window holding a candle for light inside her house during a power outage, in Borodyanka, Kyiv region, Ukraine, Thursday. Airstrikes cut power and water supplies to hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians on Tuesday, part of what the country's president called an expanding Russian campaign to drive the nation into the cold and dark. Emilio Morenatti/AP hide caption

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Emilio Morenatti/AP

Russian forces raised a Soviet-era flag in Kherson after capturing the southern Ukrainian city early in the current war. Ukraine carried out new attacks in the Kherson region on Monday, raising the possibility that it is launching a counteroffensive. This photo was taken on May 20 at the World War II memorial in Kherson. Andrey Borodulin/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrey Borodulin/AFP via Getty Images

The Kherson region of Ukraine has been under control of the Russian forces since the early days of the invasion. AP hide caption

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AP

A young man attempts to escape Russian-occupied Ukraine — then he goes silent

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Ukrainian soldiers led NPR's team into the forest in the "gray zone" where they dug one of the defensive trenches used to stall Russia's advance. Brian Mann/NPR hide caption

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Brian Mann/NPR

In the 'gray zone' outside Kherson, Ukraine's soldiers pay a terrible price

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Inna Kravchenko, 52, and her mother, Raïsa Kozlova, 75, moments after crossing by bike from Russian-occupied territory in the Kherson region to the Ukrainian-controlled village of Zelenodolsk. They were able to bring three bags of belongings but fear their house they left behind will be destroyed by Russian soldiers. Emily Feng/NPR hide caption

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Emily Feng/NPR

Ukrainian villagers flee Russian-occupied Kherson on foot, bike and wheelchair

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Finland's President Sauli Niinisto speaks during a press conference with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson at the Presidential Palace on Wednesday in Helsinki, Finland. Niinisto and Finland's Prime Minister Sanna Marin said Thursday in a joint statement that Finland must apply for NATO membership without delay. Frank Augstein/WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Frank Augstein/WPA Pool/Getty Images