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Ukrainian children

Students leave the underground school built in a Kharkiv subway station to board a bus home. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Ukraine's Kharkiv moves classrooms underground so kids survive Russian attacks

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Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks to a regional governor via videoconference at the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow, Russia, on Oct. 21, 2022. The International Criminal Court said Friday it has issued an arrest warrant for Putin and his children's rights commissioner for possible war crimes. Gavriil Grigorov/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP hide caption

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Gavriil Grigorov/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP

The International Criminal Court issues an arrest warrant for Putin

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A view of the courtyard of Kherson regional children's home in Kherson, southern Ukraine, Friday, Nov. 25, 2022. Russian authorities have been accused of deporting Ukrainian children to Russia to raise them as their own. Thousands of children were seized from schools and orphanages in Ukraine by Russian authorities, according to researchers at Yale University. Bernat Armangue/AP hide caption

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Bernat Armangue/AP

Russia deports thousands of Ukrainian children. Investigators say that's a war crime

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Katie-Jo Page sits in a room she has prepared for Mykyta, a Ukrainian boy her family was in the process of adopting, in Snohomish, Wash., on Oct 2. Annie Tritt for NPR hide caption

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Annie Tritt for NPR

These families were adopting Ukrainian orphans. Now they have to wait out Russia's war

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Andriy and Iryna Grycenko (center) mourn the death of their 11-year-old daughter, Anastasiya, at her funeral in Kharkiv, Ukraine, on Sept. 20. Anastasiya was killed on Sept. 17 when a Russian S-300 missile obliterated her home in Chuhuiv. At right is Iryna's sister, Anastasiya's aunt, Rimma Leiba. Pete Kiehart for NPR hide caption

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Pete Kiehart for NPR

Ukrainians grieve for an 11-year-old girl killed by a Russian missile

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A destroyed room in a school in Kharkiv, Ukraine, June 2. Andrii Marienko/AP hide caption

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Andrii Marienko/AP

War displaced two-thirds of Ukraine's children. Keeping them safe isn't easy

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