indigenous indigenous
Stories About

indigenous

Sunita Kumari Chaudhary weaves a dinner table mat with ropes once used by climbers in the Himalayas. She and her fellow craftswomen are part of a small start-up project in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, to repurpose Everest trash. Tanka Dhakal for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Tanka Dhakal for NPR

Teyra Yudaw (left) and his daughter, Ciwang Teyra, are members of Taiwan's Indigenous Truku tribe. An Rong Xu for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
An Rong Xu for NPR

In the battle over identity, a centuries-old issue looms in Taiwan: hunting

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1226188108/1226190298" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Umesh Balal, an activist and member of the Indigenous Magar people of Nepal, says people with disabilities need to be part of the climate conversation. Christopher Pike for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Christopher Pike for NPR

Supporters hold up a banner displaying the Haudenosaunee Confederacy as they cheer for the Haudenosaunee Nationals during a July 23, 2023 match against England in San Diego, Calif. Alan Nakkash For NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Alan Nakkash For NPR

Achuar people ply the Rio Wichimi in a solar canoe. The nonprofit Kara Solar has helped fund a fleet of six sun-powered craft in hopes of benefitting the Indigenous Achuar while reducing pressure to build roads in the rainforest. Peter Yeung for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Peter Yeung for NPR

Earlier this year, the Vatican responded to Indigenous demands and formally repudiated the "Doctrine of Discovery," which has its origins in 15th-century papal bulls, or decrees. Gregorio Borgia/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gregorio Borgia/AP

Churches confess and repent for sins against Native and Indigenous people

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1203760200/1204015255" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Guarani Indigenous block Bandeirantes highway to protest proposed legislation that would change the policy that demarcates Indigenous lands on the outskirts of Sao Paulo. Ettore Chiereguini/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ettore Chiereguini/AP

One of the 35 Denver Mountain Park bison stands in a corral as it waits to be transferred to representatives of four Native American tribes and one memorial council so they can reintroduce the animals to tribal lands March 15, 2023, near Golden, Colo. Five of the bison went to the Yuchi Tribe of Oklahoma. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Zalubowski/AP

Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese, at the left podium, is surrounded by members of the First Nations Referendum Working Group as he speaks during a press conference at Parliament House in Canberra, Thursday, March 23, 2023. Lukas Coch/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Lukas Coch/AP

A land acknowledgment is a statement before an event recognizing the Indigenous communities that originally inhabited the space where the event is taking place. Above, a high-resolution topographic image released by NASA in 2003. NASA/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/Getty Images

So you began your event with an Indigenous land acknowledgment. Now what?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1160204144/1163733524" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Aboriginal man Josh Sly of the Muggera Dancers prepares a fire for a smoking ceremony at the start of an Invasion Day rally in Sydney, Thursday, Jan. 26, 2023. Rick Rycroft/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rick Rycroft/AP

Items from NPR Life Kit host Marielle Segarra's ancestral altar, clockwise from right: a Julio Iglesias cassette tape, an address book, a crucifix, a mango candy, a card with a rose depicted on it, eyeglass lenses and a ring. Malaka Gharib/ NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Malaka Gharib/ NPR

How to deepen your connection with your ancestors

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1136051123/1214660102" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mashpee Wampanoag Kerri Helme uses plant fiber to weave a basket while sitting next to a fire on November 15, 2018, at the Wampanoag Homesite at the Plimoth Patuxet Museums, in Plymouth, Mass. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Steven Senne/AP

Pope Francis arrives at Rome's Leonardo da Vinci International airport on Sunday to board his flight to Edmonton, Canada, where he will start a six-day pastoral visit to the country. Riccardo De Luca/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Riccardo De Luca/AP