Inflation Reduction Act Inflation Reduction Act
Stories About

Inflation Reduction Act

Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm is working hard to convince more Americans to embrace electric cars — and she knows this means the country's charging infrastructure needs to improve, fast. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Electric cars have a road trip problem, even for the secretary of energy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1187224861/1198508066" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Roger Garbey and Andres Hernandez (L-R), from the Goldin Solar company, install a solar panel system on the roof of a home a day after the Trump administration announced it will impose duties of as much as 30 percent on solar equipment made abroad on January 23, 2018 in Palmetto Bay, Florida. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Biden's climate bill brings investments and jobs to many GOP strongholds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1194562279/1194562280" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nicholas Hartnett, owner of Pure Power Solar, carries a panel as he and Brian Hoeppner (right) install a solar array on the roof of a home in Frankfort, Ky., on July 17. Tax credits from the Inflation Reduction Act will reduce the cost of installing rooftop solar panels by 30%, which will in turn lower monthly electricity bills. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Conroy/AP

A year in, landmark U.S. climate policy drives energy transition but hurdles remain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1193726242/1194328215" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A sign touting the Inflation Reduction Act is seen at Glynwood Boat House in Cold Spring, N.Y., on Aug. 17, 2022. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

In an aerial view, Tesla cars recharge at a Tesla charger station in Corte Madera, Calif., on Feb. 15, 2023. The Biden administration wants to boost sales of electric cars, but it also wants to incentivize U.S.-based production. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

President of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen speaks with President Biden at the global meeting of G-20 leaders on Nov. 15, 2022, in Nusa Dua, Indonesia Leon Neal/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Leon Neal/Getty Images

President Joe Biden spoke about his administration's plans to protect Medicare and lower health care costs, Thursday, the same day his administration released draft guidance of Medicare's new plan to regulate drug prices. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Semansky/AP

The first nacelles onboard a sea energy "jack-up ship," ready for lifting into place on the Kentish Flats Offshore Wind Farm, off Whitstable, Kent, England. Chris Laurens/Construction Photography/ Avalon / Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Laurens/Construction Photography/ Avalon / Getty Images

President Biden speaks during an event Tuesday celebrating the passage of the Inflation Reduction Act on the South Lawn of the White House. The new law gives Medicare the power to negotiate drug prices. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Electric vehicles are displayed at a news conference with White House Climate Adviser Gina McCarthy and Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg in Washington, D.C., on April 22, 2021. The Biden administration's climate and health care bill passed by Congress last week revamps a tax credit for buyers of electric cars. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

You can get a $7,500 tax credit to buy an electric car, but it's really complicated

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1118052620/1118676540" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Internal Revenue Service building is seen in Washington, D.C., on April 5. The IRS got $80 billion in new funding as part of the climate and health care bill passed by Congress on Friday. Most of that money will be used to target wealthier tax evaders. Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

The IRS just got $80 billion to beef up. A big goal? Going after rich tax dodgers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1117317757/1117421163" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Paying for the Inflation Reduction Act

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1117071294/1198988506" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., talks to reporters on Friday during her weekly news conference ahead of the House vote on the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022. Despite not achieving everything Democrats wanted, the $737 billion act will focus on slowing climate change, lower health care costs, a 15% corporate minimum tax, a 1% fee on stock buybacks and enhancing IRS enforcement. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) said Friday that he believes Democrats have the votes needed to pass their Inflation Reduction Act. Mariam Zuhaib/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mariam Zuhaib/AP

The Senate is moving ahead on Democrats' sweeping health, climate and tax bill

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1116034467/1116135506" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., said Thursday that she would "move forward" with Senate Democrats' spending bill to tackle climate change, health care and tax reforms. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) said Thursday that the Senate would vote to move forward on the Inflation Reduction Act, the Democrats' package that tackles climate change, prescription drugs and inflation, this weekend. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Drugs, electric cars, taxes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1114627168/1198988542" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript