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An oil tanker is moored at the Sheskharis complex, part of Chernomortransneft JSC, a subsidiary of Transneft PJSC, in Novorossiysk, Russia, Oct. 11, one of the largest facilities for oil and petroleum products in southern Russia. The deadline is looming for Western allies to agree on a price cap on Russia oil. AP hide caption

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AP

The empty assembly line at the Duralex glassware factory in Orléans, France, on Nov. 15. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

Europe fears its industries will jet to the U.S. as energy costs force plant closures

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A Steag coal power plant in Herne, Germany, on Aug. 25. The Essen-based energy company Steag wanted to convert the old coal-fired power plant Herne 4 into a gas-fired power plant at the beginning of the year. In March, Steag decided to postpone the conversion and to continue firing the old power plant with coal. Ina Fassbender/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ina Fassbender/AFP via Getty Images

Amid an energy crisis, Germany turns to the world's dirtiest fossil fuel

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People walk near Berlin's Brandenburg Gate on the day a new law to save energy nationwide goes into effect on Thursday. The new law includes a wide variety of temporary measures, like banning the illumination of landmarks and regulating temperatures in public and private venues, to save electricity. These are a response to inflation and lower natural gas and other energy supplies from Russia. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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Carsten Koall/Getty Images