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From left, Nile Rodgers, Chappell Roan and Diplo are among the more than 280 musicians who signed a letter to senators in support of concert ticketing reforms. Michael Loccisano/Getty Images; Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images; Leon Bennett/Getty Images for MBJx David Yurman hide caption

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Michael Loccisano/Getty Images; Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images; Leon Bennett/Getty Images for MBJx David Yurman
Sarah Stier/Getty Images

President Biden convened his Competition Council at the White House on March 5 after his administration announced new actions to cap credit card late fees at $8, compared with $32. Nathan Howard/Getty Images hide caption

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Nathan Howard/Getty Images

Taking on junk fees is popular. But can it win Biden more voters?

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President Biden speaks about new measures to disclose hidden service fees alongside executives from companies that are vowing the end the practice. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Robert Smith of The Cure performs in Glastonbury, England, in 2019. This week, he shared his frustrations with Ticketmaster, and announced Thursday that the company would lower fees and offer partial refunds to The Cure's ticket purchasers. Ian Gavan/Getty Images hide caption

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Ian Gavan/Getty Images

In his State of the Union address, President Biden delivers remarks on tackling what he calls "junk fees," or the unknown added costs that get tacked onto hotel, airline and other bills in the travel and entertainment sectors. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

An illustration of the Ticketmaster website from 2022. The ticketing giant has come under renewed scrutiny from music fans and lawmakers in recent months. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Beyoncé performs at the Oscars in March 2022. Her "Renaissance" World Tour later this year will mark her first solo tour since 2016. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Penny Harrison and her son Parker Harrison rally outside the U.S. Capitol during the Senate Judiciary Committee's Ticketmaster hearing on Tuesday morning. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Senate's Ticketmaster hearing featured plenty of Taylor Swift puns and protesters

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Bad Bunny, pictured performing on stage in Philadelphia in September, finished his international tour in Mexico City last weekend — but many fans were denied entry after being told their tickets were illegitimate. Theo Wargo/Getty Images for Roc Nation hide caption

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Theo Wargo/Getty Images for Roc Nation

Taylor Swift poses with her trophies at the 50th Annual American Music Awards in Los Angeles in November, just days after the botched ticket presale. Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images
Christopher Polk/Getty Images

Ticket scalpers and the Taylor Swift fiasco (Encore)

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