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Chemical companies and water utilities have sued the EPA after it issued rules limiting some PFAs, or "forever chemicals" that are linked to human health risks. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images/Getty Images North America hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images/Getty Images North America

From left: Shohei Ohtani, Te-Hina Paopao, former U.S. President Donald J. Trump Matt Krohn, Getty Images; Steph Chambers/Getty Images; Megan Briggs/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt Krohn, Getty Images; Steph Chambers/Getty Images; Megan Briggs/Getty Images

Following a new EPA rule, public water systems will have five years to address instances where there is too much PFAS in tap water – three years to sample their systems and establish the existing levels of PFAS, and an additional two years to install water treatment technologies if their levels are too high. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

EPA is limiting PFAS chemicals in drinking water in the U.S. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

EPA puts limits on 'forever chemicals' in drinking water

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Eva Stebel, water researcher, pours a water sample into a smaller glass container for experimentation as part of drinking water and PFAS research at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Center For Environmental Solutions and Emergency Response, Feb. 16, 2023, in Cincinnati. Joshua A. Bickel/AP hide caption

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Joshua A. Bickel/AP

A study released by the U.S. Geological Survey on Wednesday estimates that at least 45% of U.S. tap water could be contaminated with at least one form of PFAS, which could have harmful health effects. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP