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climate solutions

Carlos Moreno, a Franco-Colombian urbanist, has been helping spread the idea of 15-minute cities — where people can access key things in their life within a short walk, bike ride or transit ride of their home. But the climate solution is seeing huge challenges, including conspiracy theories. Julia Simon/NPR hide caption

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Julia Simon/NPR

It's a global climate solution — if it can get past conspiracy theories and NIMBYs

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

How kids are making sense of climate change and extreme weather

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Conservation professionals learn how to respond to cultural heritage emergencies following disasters at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston on Sept. 20. Chloe Veltman/NPR hide caption

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Chloe Veltman/NPR

Have an heirloom ruined by climate disaster? There's a hotline to call for help

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Jacob Murungi collects water near his home in central Kenya — harvesting it from fog that forms overnight and clings to trees. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

How to harvest water from clouds of fog

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The giant white marble boulders that line the Agos River just north of the Philippine village of Daraitan are sacred to the Indigenous Dumagat people. They use the boulders to perform rituals to ward off sickness and keep their village safe. If the Kaliwa Dam is built upriver, the Dumagat say these rocks will be destroyed to make way for the increased water flow. Ashley Westerman/NPR hide caption

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Ashley Westerman/NPR

The Philippines' capital is running out of water. Is building a dam the solution?

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Marching bands are getting creative to beat the heat of climate change. Some changes include covering brass instruments under direct sunlight, scheduling frequent water breaks and time to put on extra sunscreen, no longer wearing traditional marching band uniforms at games and practicing before sunrise or after sunset. Bridget Dowd/KJZZ hide caption

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Bridget Dowd/KJZZ
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People working on climate solutions are facing a big obstacle: conspiracy theories

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To help conserve usage of the taxed resources like the Colorado River (pictured here), engineers are recycling raw sewage into safe drinking water. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Ciara Imani May founded Rebundle, a Missouri company that makes biodegradable hair extensions. Rebundle hide caption

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Rebundle

Any job can be a climate solutions job: Ask this teacher, electrician or beauty CEO

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Students give a presentation at a construction site in South Baltimore. The student activists, who formed the group Free Your Voice, are fighting against a very different kind of danger in their neighborhood: air pollution and climate change. B.A. Parker/NPR hide caption

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B.A. Parker/NPR

Student activists are pushing back against big polluters — and winning

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Avocados grow on trees in an orchard. Researchers in California have developed a new variety that is more resistant to extreme climates. Alfredo Estrella/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alfredo Estrella/AFP via Getty Images

Chef Zaid Khan prepares food in Boston to be sold through the app Too Good To Go. The app helps establishments sell food that would otherwise go to waste. David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Want to fight climate change and food waste? One app can do both

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This natural pond helps reserve precipitation in the ecological corridor of Qian'an, a city in China's Hebei province. Like many other Chinese cities, Qian'an used to fall victim to urban flooding during rainy seasons. But things have changed since 2015, when the city was included in a national pilot program for "sponge city" construction. Mu Yu/Xinhua via Getty Images hide caption

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Mu Yu/Xinhua via Getty Images

Making cities 'spongy' could help fight flooding — by steering the water underground

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Buying appliances and vehicles that run on electricity, not fossil fuels, can help reduce our carbon footprint. Making these upgrades will cost money — so you will need to plan ahead, says Joel Rosenberg of the nonprofit group Rewiring America. Clockwise from top left: Bloomberg via Getty Images, Schon/Getty Images, Jackyenjoyphotography/Getty Images, Juan Algar/Getty Images; Collage by Kaz Fantone hide caption

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Clockwise from top left: Bloomberg via Getty Images, Schon/Getty Images, Jackyenjoyphotography/Getty Images, Juan Algar/Getty Images; Collage by Kaz Fantone

These 5 big purchases can save energy — and money — at home

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U.S Marine Corps Col. Thomas M. Bedell, the commanding officer of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, poses for a photo at the station's Energy and Water Operations Center on MCAS Miramar. Lance Cpl. Jose S. GuerreroDeLeon/U.S. Marines/DVIDS hide caption

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Lance Cpl. Jose S. GuerreroDeLeon/U.S. Marines/DVIDS

The military is turning to microgrids to fight global threats — and global warming

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Kiran Joshi fills a copper vessel with water from Ashwanaula, a groundwater spring in the village of Raushil, where she lives with her family Viraj Nayar for NPR hide caption

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Viraj Nayar for NPR

Hospitals are some of the biggest carbon polluters almost no one thinks about. The American health care system accounts for an estimated 8.5% of the country's carbon footprint. Reid Frazier/The Allegheny Front hide caption

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Reid Frazier/The Allegheny Front

Health care has a massive carbon footprint. These doctors are trying to change that

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Trees and other plants help keep cities cooler. In New York City, scientists are working to understand how to maximize the benefits of urban green spaces. Here, residents gather in Brooklyn Bridge Park on a hot summer night. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Climate solutions are necessary. So we're dedicating a week to highlight them

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Seaweed Generation's marine biologist Duncan Smallman at the company's workshop in Glasgow, Scotland. Robert Ormerod for NPR hide caption

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Robert Ormerod for NPR