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Boeing 737 Max 9

David Calhoun stepped down as CEO of Boeing and will remain until the end of 2024. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

A unfinished Boeing 737 Max sits outside Boeing's manufacturing facility in Renton, Wash., on Feb. 27, 2024. The top federal safety investigator says Boeing still has not provided key information that could shed light on what went wrong when a door plug blew off an in-flight 737 Max 9 in January. Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

Boeing is withholding key details about door plug on Alaska 737 Max 9 jet, NTSB says

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An Alaska Airlines 737 Max 9 that made an emergency landing at Portland International Airport on Jan. 5 is parked in Portland, Ore., on Jan. 23. A door plug blew out shortly after the plane took off from Portland. There were no serious injuries, but it has renewed concerns about Boeing and production lapses. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

NTSB says key bolts were missing from the door plug that blew off a Boeing 737 Max 9

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An unpainted Boeing 737 Max 8 is parked at Renton Municipal Airport adjacent to Boeing's factory in Renton, Wash. on January 25, 2024. Boeing is still reeling from the fallout of an Alaska Airlines 737 Max 9 which lost a part of its fuselage in mid-flight earlier in the month. Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

Boeing declines to give a financial outlook as it focuses on quality and safety

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A Boeing 737 MAX 9 for Alaska Airlines is pictured along with other aircraft at Renton Municipal Airport adjacent to Boeing's factory in Washington. Alaska Airlines resumed service of its 737 MAX 9 fleet on January 26, 2024, three weeks after an emergency landing prompted sweeping inspections of the aircraft. Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

The Boeing 737 Max 9 takes off again, but the company faces more turbulence ahead

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Alaska Airlines N704AL, a 737 Max 9, which made an emergency landing at Portland International Airport on Jan. 5, is parked at a maintenance hanger in Portland, Ore., this week. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

The Alaska Airlines Boeing 737 MAX 9 aircraft is seen at Portland International Airport on January 9, 2024 in Oregon. The plane made an emergency landing following a midair fuselage blowout on Jan. 5. None of the 171 passengers and six crew members was seriously injured. Mathieu Lewis-Rolland/Getty Images hide caption

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Mathieu Lewis-Rolland/Getty Images

The Federal Aviation Administration has grounded 171 of the 737 Max 9 planes in the United States, as it conducts an audit of the Boeing's production line. FAA officials have said the regulator is considering adding an independent third-party inspector to oversee Boeing inspections and quality. NTSB via AP hide caption

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NTSB via AP