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The Twitter Paradox: How A Platform Designed For Free Speech Enables Internet Trolls

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When Twitter started, its founders wanted to connect people from all parts of the world, but the company is struggling to grow beyond its 300 million users. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Twitter's Dual Challenges: Taming The Trolls, Attracting More Users

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Author Kelly Oxford attends a brunch in Hollywood in September. Oxford invited women to share stories of assault on Twitter; she says she received more than 1 million responses. RandyShropshire/Getty Images for Girlboss Inc. hide caption

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RandyShropshire/Getty Images for Girlboss Inc.

Several companies are said to be considering bids for Twitter. Chesnot/Getty Images hide caption

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Chesnot/Getty Images

As Buyers Circle, Could Twitter Be Better Off As A Nonprofit?

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Leslie Jones poses backstage during the Sony Pictures Entertainment presentation at CinemaCon 2016, the official convention of the National Association of Theatre Owners, at Caesars Palace on April 12, 2016, in Las Vegas. Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

Milo Yiannopoulos, a conservative writer and Internet personality, holds a news conference down the street from the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Fla., last month. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump caused a stir recently by saying that data and campaign technology was "overrated" in the political world. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Trump's Disinterest In Data Has Some Republicans Worried

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